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Michael Martinez

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BIO

Michael E. Martinez is an Associate Professor in the Department of Education at the University of California, Irvine. He teaches courses on learning and cognition, and on intelligence.

A former high school science teacher, Dr. Martinez received his Ph.D. in educational psychology from Stanford University in 1987. He joined the Division of Research at the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, New Jersey, where he developed new forms of computer-based testing for assessment in science, architecture, and engineering.

In 1994-95, Dr. Martinez was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of the South Pacific in the Fiji Islands. In 2001-02, Martinez served as program director for the National Science Foundation.

Dr. Martinez now conducts research on the nature and modifiability of intelligence. He has published in such journals as the Educational Psychologist, the Journal of Educational Measurement, and the Journal of the American Society for Information Science. His first book, Education as the Cultivation of Intelligence was published in 2000 by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Dr. Martinez was a College Board Visiting Scholar for the 2002-03 academic year, and was a Mellon Visiting Scholar at Columbia University during 2003-04. He is now Co-Director of the CSU-UCI Joint Ed.D. Program and Vice Chair of the Department of Education. 

EXPERTISE

cognition and learning
intelligence
science education 

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

Martinez, M. E. (2006). What is metacognition? Phi Delta Kappan, vol. 87, no. 9, 696-699.

Martinez, M. E. (2004). Differential achievement: Seeking causes, cures, and construct validity. In R. Zwick (Ed.), Rethinking the SAT: The future of standardized testing in university admissions (pp. 235-243). New York: Routledge Falmer.

Martinez, M. E. (2000). Education as the cultivation of intelligence. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Martinez, M. E. (1999). Cognition and the question of test item format. Educational Psychologist, 34, 207-218.