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MSP News: Farewell and a Look Back

September 5, 2019


This is the final MSPnet Newsletter. The MSPnet.org website will be archived and will no longer be actively maintained.

MSPnet staff at TERC in Cambridge, MA, with funding from NSF, have been fortunate to serve the MSP community through MSPnet.org since 2003. It has been a great privilege to facilitate the sharing of resources, research, presentations, career opportunities, and LNC conferences, as well as provide national and international dissemination of project work conducted by those in NSF’s MSP and STEM+C programs. We extend our sincere thanks for your participation and support over the years. As this is our last MSPnet newsletter we also provide a recap of most popular resources over the last 5 years.

As this work winds down, we are excited to announce a new online learning community, the STEM Teacher Leadership Network: STEMTLnet.org, which has recently been funded by NSF! If you are a researcher or educator interested in STEM teacher leadership we hope that you will take part!

This effort will provide an online learning community that will connect STEM teacher leaders from PAEMST and other NSF programs to other STEM teacher leaders across the country. It will also provide a venue for researchers, administrators, policy makers and practitioners to share opportunities related to STEM teacher leadership, professional development events, conferences, and emerging research, and resources related to the field of STEM teaching and learning.

The network is currently in its beta phase and we will have a full launch this Fall. We will automatically sign you up to receive the STEMTLnet newsletter in order to update you on the launch, and to inform you of events and resources. You can, of course, unsubscribe at any time.

Please take a look back with us, as we highlight some of the most popular libary posts, project papers, webinars, and videos from the last 5 years.


NEWS IN BRIEF


Most Popular Library Items
1. "How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures," National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, The National Academies Press, October 2018.
2. "The Social Side Of Education Reform: A Research Primer," Alan J. Daly, Kara S. Finnigan, Susan Moore Johnson, Matthew A. Kraft, Carrie R. Leana, Frits K. Pil, Matthew Ronfeldt, James P. Spillane, Esther Quintero, Albert Shanker Institute, April 2016.
3. "Resources for Teaching: Examining Personal and Institutional Predictors of High-Quality Instruction," Heather C. Hill, David Blazar, Kathleen Lynch, AERA Open, December 2015.
4. "Explaining Teacher Effects on Achievement Using Measures from Multiple Research Traditions," Andrew Bacher-Hicks, Mark Chin, Heather C. Hill, Douglas O. Staiger, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 2015.
5. "Assessing And Evaluating Teacher Education Programs: APA Task Force Report," F. Worrell, M. Brabeck, C. Dwyer, K. Geisinger, R. Marx, G. Noell, R. Pianta, American Psychological Association, 2014.
6. "Competing Strands Of Educational Reform Policy: Can Collaborative School Reform and Teacher Evaluation Reform Be Reconciled?," Nathan D. Jones, Elizabeth Bettini, Mary T. Brownell, Albert Shanker Institute, April 2016.
7. "Does Class Size Matter?," Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, National Education Policy Center, February 2014.
8. "STEM Integration in K-12 Education: Status, Prospects, and an Agenda for Research," Margaret Honey, Greg Pearson, Heidi Schweingruber, Committee on Integrated STEM Education, National Academy of Engineering, National Research Council, National Academies Press, February 2014.
9. "Preschoolers’ Inquisitiveness and Science-relevant Problem Solving," Maria Fusaro, Maureen C. Smith, Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 2018.
10. "Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards: Strategies for Educational Leaders," William R. Penuel, Christopher J. Harris, Angela Haydel DeBarger, Phi Delta Kappan, March 2015.

Most Popular Articles from our MSP and STEM+C Community
1. "Intra- and Interschool Interactions about Instruction: Exploring the Conditions for Social Capital Development," James P. Spillane, Megan Hopkins, Tracy M. Sweet, American Journal of Education, November 2015.
2. "The Influence of Teachers’ Knowledge on Student Learning in Middle School Physical Science Classrooms," Philip Sadler, Gerhard Sonnert, Harold Coyle, Nancy Cook Smith, Jaimie L. Miller, American Educational Research Journal, 2013.
3. "Using Value-Added Models to Measure Teacher Effects on Students' Motivation and Achievement," Erik A. Ruzek, Thurston Domina, AnneMarie M. Conley, Greg J. Duncan, Stuart A. Karabenick, Journal of Early Adolescence, 2015.
4. "The Impact of a Middle School Engineering Course on Students’ Academic Achievement and Non-Cognitive Skills," Meltem Alemdar, Roxanne A. Moore, Jeremy A. Lingle, Jeff Rosen, Jessica Gale, Marion C. Usselman, International Journal of Education in Mathematics, Science and T, 2018.
5. "Measuring Science Instructional Practice: A Survey Tool for the Age of NGSS," Kathryn N. Hayes, Christine S. Lee, Rachelle DiStefano, Dawn O'Connor, Jeffery C. Seitz, Journal of Science Teacher Education, February 2016.
6. "Designing Educational Systems to Support Enactment of the Next Generation Science Standards," Charles W. Anderson, Elizabeth X. de los Santos, Sarah Bodbyl, Beth A. Covitt, Kirsten D. Edwards, James Brian Hancock II, Qinyun Lin, William R. Penuel, Mary Margaret Welch, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, July 2018.
7. "Eighth-Grade Algebra Course Placement and Student Motivation for Mathematics," Rahila Simzar, Thurston Domina, Cathy Tran, AERA Open, January-March 2016.
8. "Computational Pedagogy: Fostering a New Method of Teaching," Osman Yasar, Peter Veronesi, Jose Maliekal, Leigh J. Little, Sounthone E. Vattana, Ibrahim Halil Yeter, ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, June 2016.
9. "Research-Practice Partnerships in Education: Outcomes, Dynamics, and Open Questions," Cynthia E. Coburn, William R. Penuel, Educational Researcher, February 2016.
10. "Supporting Integrated STEM In The Elementary Classroom: A Professional Development Approach Centered On An Engineering Design Challenge," Anne T. Estapa, Kristina M. Tank, International Journal of STEM Education, March 2017.

Most Popular Webinars
1. "The Current State of K-12 Computer Science Education in the US," presented by Jeanne Century and Sarah Wille, March 2015.
2. "How to Design 3D Formative Assessments for NGSS," presented by William Penuel and Philip Bell, February 2017.
3. "District & School Implementation of NGSS Through Curriculum Adaptation & Development," presented by Philip Bell and Kerri Wingert, January 2017.

Most Popular MSP/STEM+C Videos from the STEM for All Video Showcases

Innovators Developing Accessible Tools for Astronomy, 2019.

Presented by: Kate Meredith, Bret Feranchak, Santiago Gasca, Alexandra Grossi, Kathy Gustavson, Jim Hammerman, Eric Hochberg, Tim Spuck, & Annie Wilson

SciGirls Code: A National Connected Learning CS Model, 2018.

Presented by: Joan Freese, Sarah Carter, Katie Hessen, & Cassandra Scharber

Learning Trajectories for Everyday Computing (LTEC), 2016.

Presented by: Andy Isaacs, Maya Israel, & George Reese


DETAILS BELOW


Most Popular Library Items
1. "How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures," National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, The National Academies Press, October 2018.

"There are many reasons to be curious about the way people learn, and the past several decades have seen an explosion of research that has important implications for individual learning, schooling, workforce training, and policy. In 2000, How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition was published and its influence has been wide and deep. The report summarized insights on the nature of learning in school-aged children; described principles for the design of effective learning environments; and provided examples of how that could be implemented in the classroom. Since then, researchers have continued to investigate the nature of learning and have generated new findings related to the neurological processes involved in learning, individual and cultural variability related to learning, and educational technologies. In addition to expanding scientific understanding of the mechanisms of learning and how the brain adapts throughout the lifespan, there have been important discoveries about influences on learning, particularly sociocultural factors and the structure of learning environments. How People Learn II: Learners, Contexts, and Cultures provides a much-needed update incorporating insights gained from this research over the past decade. The book expands on the foundation laid out in the 2000 report and takes an in-depth look at the constellation of influences that affect individual learning. How People Learn II will become an indispensable resource to understand learning throughout the lifespan for educators of students and adults."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33650


2. "The Social Side Of Education Reform: A Research Primer," Alan J. Daly, Kara S. Finnigan, Susan Moore Johnson, Matthew A. Kraft, Carrie R. Leana, Frits K. Pil, Matthew Ronfeldt, James P. Spillane, Esther Quintero, Albert Shanker Institute, April 2016.

"This collection of research essays describes compelling evidence that the school environment influences teacher effectiveness (Kraft & Papay, essay 1), that teachers' social capital is a vehicle to increase schools' instructional capacity (Leana & Pil, essay 2), and that teaching can be improved through effective professional collaboration (Ronfeldt, essay 3). We must look at the mechanisms and specific conditions that encourage the development of professional relations within and across schools (Spillane, essay 4). Stable, trusting relationships are key to implementing complex change (Finnigan & Daly, essay 5); and it is important to anticipate when policies may be eroding such relationships by examining their unintended consequences on the social fabric of schools (Johnson, essay 6)."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/29261


3. "Resources for Teaching: Examining Personal and Institutional Predictors of High-Quality Instruction," Heather C. Hill, David Blazar, Kathleen Lynch, AERA Open, December 2015.

"Policymakers and researchers have for many years advocated disparate approaches to ensuring teachers deliver high-quality instruction, including requiring that teachers complete specific training requirements, possess a minimum level of content knowledge, and use curriculum materials and professional development resources available from schools and districts. In this paper, we investigate the extent to which these factors, which we conceptualize as resources for teaching, predict instructional quality in upper elementary mathematics classrooms. Results show that teachers mathematical knowledge and their district context explained a moderate share of the variation in mathematics-specific teaching dimensions; other factors, such as teacher experience, preparation, non-instructional work hours, and measures of the school environment, explained very little variation in any dimension."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/29254


4. "Explaining Teacher Effects on Achievement Using Measures from Multiple Research Traditions," Andrew Bacher-Hicks, Mark Chin, Heather C. Hill, Douglas O. Staiger, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, 2015.

"Researchers have identified many characteristics of teachers and teaching that contribute to student outcomes. However, most studies investigate only a small number of these characteristics, likely underestimating the overall contribution. In this paper, we use a set of 28 teacher-level predictors drawn from multiple research traditions to explain teacher-level variation in student outcomes. These predictors collectively explain 28% of teacher-level variability in state standardized math test scores and 40% in a predictor-aligned math test. In addition, each individual predictor explains only a small, relatively unique portion of the total teacher-level variability. This first finding highlights the importance of choosing predictors and outcomes that are well aligned, and the second suggests that the phenomena underlying teacher effects is multidimensional."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/29253


5. "Assessing And Evaluating Teacher Education Programs: APA Task Force Report," F. Worrell, M. Brabeck, C. Dwyer, K. Geisinger, R. Marx, G. Noell, R. Pianta, American Psychological Association, 2014.

"Effective teaching has long been an issue of national concern, but in recent years focus on the effectiveness of programs to produce high-quality teachers has sharpened. Long-standing achievement gaps persist despite large-scale legislative changes at the federal and state levels, and American students continue to show poorer performance on international tests compared to peers in other developed nations. These and other factors have resulted in the creation of new accreditation standards for teacher education programs. These standards, developed by the Council for the Accreditation of Education Programs (CAEP), require teacher education programs to demonstrate their graduates are capable of having strong positive effects on student learning. The data and methods required to evaluate the effectiveness of teacher education programs ought to be informed by well-established scientific methods that have evolved in the science of psychology, which at its core addresses the measurement of behavior. Recent work highlights the potential utility of three methods for assessing teacher education program effectiveness: (1) value-added assess- ments of student achievement, (2) standardized observation protocols, and (3) surveys of teacher performance. These methodologies can be used by institutions to demonstrate that the teacher candidates who complete their programs are well prepared to support student learning. In this light, we discuss the evaluation of teacher education programs using these three methodologies, highlight the utility and limitations of each of these methodologies for evaluating teacher education programs, and provide a set of recommendations for their optimal use by teacher education programs and other stakeholders in teacher preparation, including states and professional associations."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/29248


6. "Competing Strands Of Educational Reform Policy: Can Collaborative School Reform and Teacher Evaluation Reform Be Reconciled?," Nathan D. Jones, Elizabeth Bettini, Mary T. Brownell, Albert Shanker Institute, April 2016.

"Both collaborative school reform and teacher evaluation reform show promise for improving teaching and learning. Yet, when enacted in schools, they have the potential to undermine one another. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to begin conceptualizing one avenue for reconciling these policies. We consider how future research might begin to develop measures to evaluate collaborative teaching, specifically teachers performance as a team engaged in collaboratively enhancing students learning. We urge policymakers, researchers and practitioners alike to take seriously the need to make space in the evaluation process for the assessment of team work in schools."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/29262


7. "Does Class Size Matter?," Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, National Education Policy Center, February 2014.

"This policy brief summarizes the academic literature on the impact of class size and finds that class size is an important determinant of a variety of student outcomes, ranging from test scores to broader life outcomes. Smaller classes are particularly effective at raising achievement levels of low-income and minority children. Policymakers should carefully weigh the efficacy of class-size policy against other potential uses of funds. While lower class size has a demonstrable cost, it may prove the more cost-effective policy overall."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/26711


8. "STEM Integration in K-12 Education: Status, Prospects, and an Agenda for Research," Margaret Honey, Greg Pearson, Heidi Schweingruber, Committee on Integrated STEM Education, National Academy of Engineering, National Research Council, National Academies Press, February 2014.

"Leaders in business, government, and academia assert that education in the STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) is vital not only to U.S. innovation capacity but also as a foundation for successful employment, including (but not limited to) work in the STEM fields. K-12 STEM education, including standards and assessments, has tended to focus on the individual subjects, most often science and mathematics. The T and E of STEM have received relatively little attention. However, recent reform efforts, like the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), are stressing STEM connections - in the case of NGSS, between science and engineering. STEM Integration in K-12 Education examines current efforts to connect the STEM disciplines in K-12 education. This report identifies and characterizes existing approaches to integrated STEM education, both in formal and after- and out-of-school settings. The report reviews the evidence for the impact of integrated approaches on various student outcomes, and it proposes a set of priority research questions to advance the understanding of integrated STEM education. STEM Integration in K-12 Education proposes a framework to provide a common perspective and vocabulary for researchers, practitioners, and others to identify, discuss, and investigate specific integrated STEM initiatives within the K-12 education system of the United States. STEM Integration in K-12 Education makes recommendations for designers of integrated STEM experiences, assessment developers, and researchers to design and document effective integrated STEM education. This report will help to further their work and improve the chances that some forms of integrated STEM education will make a positive difference in student learning and interest and other valued outcomes."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/26696


9. "Preschoolers’ Inquisitiveness and Science-relevant Problem Solving," Maria Fusaro, Maureen C. Smith, Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 2018.

"Preschoolers use their emerging scientific inquiry skills, including seeking information through questions, to explore, and solve problems within, the physical world around them. This study examines preschoolers' attempts to solve novel science-relevant problems and their use of science-relevant ideas within those problem solutions. Four- to five-year-olds (N = 24) were presented with seven novel problems, depicted in line drawings (e.g., determining which of two bags holds pillows, rather than rocks). Individual differences were examined in the use of foundational science-relevant concepts and skills within children's responses (California Department of Education, 2012), as well as in the child's tendency to ask questions (i.e., inquisitiveness) in a second open-ended task. MANCOVA analyses indicated that inquisitiveness was associated with the accuracy and fluency of children's problem solutions, even after accounting for differences in receptive vocabulary, gender, and age. Further research is warranted on the interplay of inquisitiveness, science knowledge, as well as other socialization and educational influences, in children's early science skills, including their ability to engineer solutions to realistic problems."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33274


10. "Implementing the Next Generation Science Standards: Strategies for Educational Leaders," William R. Penuel, Christopher J. Harris, Angela Haydel DeBarger, Phi Delta Kappan, March 2015.

"The Next Generation Science Standards embody a new vision for science education grounded in the idea that science is both a body of knowledge and a set of linked practices for developing knowledge. The authors describe strategies that they suggest school and district leaders consider when designing strategies to support NGSS implementation."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/27941


Most Popular Articles from our MSP and STEM+C Community
1. "Intra- and Interschool Interactions about Instruction: Exploring the Conditions for Social Capital Development," James P. Spillane, Megan Hopkins, Tracy M. Sweet, American Journal of Education, November 2015.

"Although social ties are a necessary condition for social capital, there is a dearth of research on the factors associated with the existence of such ties among school staff. Using a mixed-methods approach, we examined the role of both formal organizational infrastructure and individual characteristics in shaping advice and information interactions about instruction among school staff within and between schools. Our findings from social-network models showed that, while individual characteristics were associated with within- and between-school ties, aspects of the formal school organization had larger effects. Moreover, having a subject-specific leadership position most strongly predicted between-school ties. Our analysis of interview data supported and extended these findings, showing that leadership positions worked in tandem with other aspects of the organizational infrastructure, such as organizational routines, to influence school staff members interactions about instruction."

MSPnet Location: Library >> MSP Papers
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/29259


2. "The Influence of Teachers’ Knowledge on Student Learning in Middle School Physical Science Classrooms," Philip Sadler, Gerhard Sonnert, Harold Coyle, Nancy Cook Smith, Jaimie L. Miller, American Educational Research Journal, 2013.

"This study examines the relationship between teacher knowledge and student learning for 9,556 students of 181 middle school physical science teachers. Assessment instruments based on the National Science Education Standards with 20 items in common were administered several times during the school year to both students and their teachers. For items that had a very popular wrong answer, the teachers who could identify this misconception had larger classroom gains, much larger than if the teachers knew only the correct answer. On items on which students did not exhibit misconceptions, teacher subject matter knowledge alone accounted for higher student gains. This finding suggests that a teachers ability to identify students most common wrong answer on multiple-choice items, a form of pedagogical content knowledge, is an additional measure of science teacher competence."

MSPnet Location: Library >> MSP Papers
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/29255


3. "Using Value-Added Models to Measure Teacher Effects on Students' Motivation and Achievement," Erik A. Ruzek, Thurston Domina, AnneMarie M. Conley, Greg J. Duncan, Stuart A. Karabenick, Journal of Early Adolescence, 2015.

"Value-added (VA) models measure teacher contributions to student learning and are increasingly employed in educational reform efforts. Using data from 35 seventh-grade teachers and 2,026 students across seven schools, we employ VA methods to measure teacher contributions to students' motivational orientations (mastery and performance achievement goals) and their mathematics performance. The analysis suggests less variation in teachers' contributions to students' achievement goals than mathematics achievement. However, during a time when most students' mastery motivation is declining sharply, a one standard deviation increase in teacher contributions to student mastery orientation is associated with a 40% smaller decline in student mastery goals. Teacher mastery contributions are also associated with gains in a student's seventh-grade mathematics achievement (d = .11). In addition to using VA measures to focus on improving student achievement, these measures can be used to orient teachers, schools, and districts on the enhancement of students' motivation to learn."

MSPnet Location: Library >> MSP Papers
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/29250


4. "The Impact of a Middle School Engineering Course on Students’ Academic Achievement and Non-Cognitive Skills," Meltem Alemdar, Roxanne A. Moore, Jeremy A. Lingle, Jeff Rosen, Jessica Gale, Marion C. Usselman, International Journal of Education in Mathematics, Science and T, 2018.

"Engineering and integrated STEM experiences are being promoted at the K-12 level to increase interest and retention in STEM and to reinforce learning of mathematics and science content. However, research is still emerging regarding best practices for curriculum development, student impacts, and transfer of knowledge across disciplines. The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of middle school engineering curriculum on students' academic achievement in science and mathematics and also on non-cognitive skills such as student engagement and self-efficacy in academics. Specifically, the Engineering Design Process (EDP) conceptual model is used as a framework for the engineering curriculum, which is also grounded in Problem-Based Learning (PBL) practices while integrating science practices and foundational mathematics. Participants include 6th-8th grade students at four public middle schools in Georgia. The research results show that students who have taken at least two engineering courses show statistically significant gains on state-level standardized science and mathematics tests over those students who were never enrolled in these courses. Further, the results show a statistically significant increase in cognitive and behavioral engagement in STEM and science interest. The results of this study support the idea that enabling students to practice their science and mathematics skills and knowledge within the context of interesting and engaging middle school engineering classes can significantly benefit both their engagement in STEM and their academic achievement."

MSPnet Location: Library >> MSP Papers
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33606


5. "Measuring Science Instructional Practice: A Survey Tool for the Age of NGSS," Kathryn N. Hayes, Christine S. Lee, Rachelle DiStefano, Dawn O'Connor, Jeffery C. Seitz, Journal of Science Teacher Education, February 2016.

"Ambitious efforts are taking place to implement a new vision for science education in the United States, in both Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)- adopted states and those states creating their own, often related, standards. In- service and pre-service teacher educators are involved in supporting teacher shifts in practice toward the new standards. With these efforts, it will be important to document shifts in science instruction toward the goals of NGSS and broader science education reform. Survey instruments are often used to capture instructional practices; however, existing surveys primarily measure inquiry based on previous definitions and standards and with a few exceptions, disregard key instructional practices considered outside the scope of inquiry. A comprehensive survey and a clearly defined set of items do not exist. Moreover, items specific to the NGSS Science and Engineering practices have not yet been tested. To address this need, we developed and validated a Science Instructional Practices survey instrument that is appropriate for NGSS and other related science standards. Survey construction was based on a literature review establishing key areas of science instruction, followed by a systematic process for identifying and creating items. Instrument validity and reliability were then tested through a procedure that included cognitive interviews, expert review, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (using independent samples), and analysis of criterion validity. Based on these analyses, final subscales include: Instigating an Investigation, Data Collection and Analysis, Critique, Explanation and Argumentation, Modeling, Traditional Instruction, Prior Knowledge, Science Communication, and Discourse."
  

MSPnet Location: Library >> MSP Papers
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/29337


6. "Designing Educational Systems to Support Enactment of the Next Generation Science Standards," Charles W. Anderson, Elizabeth X. de los Santos, Sarah Bodbyl, Beth A. Covitt, Kirsten D. Edwards, James Brian Hancock II, Qinyun Lin, William R. Penuel, Mary Margaret Welch, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, July 2018.

"This article reports on a design-based implementation research (DBIR) project that addresses the question: How can classrooms be supported at scale to achieve the three-dimensional learning goals of the Next Generation Science Standards? Inherent in this question are three key design challenges: (i) three-dimensional learning -- the multidimensional changes in curriculum, assessment, and instruction required for three-dimensional learning; (ii) scale -- the necessity of change at multiple scales in educational systems; and (iii) diversity -- achieving rigor in our expectations with responsiveness to the enduring diversity of our students, classrooms, and schools. We discuss findings from the Carbon TIME project, which focuses on teaching carbon cycling and energy transformations at multiple scales. Findings focus on design and knowledge building in three interconnected contexts. (i) Assessment -- understanding and assessing students' three-dimensional learning. Learning progression frameworks provide insight into students' reasoning and the basis for efficient and reliable classroom and large-scale assessments that have used automated scoring of constructed responses for over 80,000 tests. (ii) Classrooms -- classroom discourse and learning communities. Six Carbon TIME units are based on an instructional model that scaffolds students' engagement with phenomena as questioners, investigators, and explainers. The units support substantial learning and reduce the achievement gap between high-pretest and low-pretest students, but with substantial differences among teachers. (iii) Professional communities -- a professional development course of study and research-practice partnerships address issues of organizational resources, conflicting norms and obligations, and building practical knowledge in schools and districts. Project results show continuing advantages for schools with more organizational resources. Overall, results provide evidence that it is possible to measure and achieve three-dimensional learning at scale. However, this accomplishment requires substantial investments in the material, human, and social resources of educational communities of practice."

MSPnet Location: Library >> MSP Papers
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33662


7. "Eighth-Grade Algebra Course Placement and Student Motivation for Mathematics," Rahila Simzar, Thurston Domina, Cathy Tran, AERA Open, January-March 2016.

This study uses student panel data to examine the association between algebra placement and student motivation for mathematics. Changes in achievement goals, expectancy, and task value for students in eighth-grade algebra are compared with those of peers placed in lower-level mathematics courses (N = 3,306). In our sample, students placed in algebra reported an increase in performance-avoidance goals as well as decreases in academic self-efficacy and task value. These relations were attenuated for students who had high mathematics achievement prior to algebra placement. Whereas all students reported an overall decline in performance-approach goals over the course of eighth grade, previously high-achieving students reported an increase in these goals. Lastly, previously high-achieving students reported an increase in mastery goals. These findings suggest that while previously high-achieving students may benefit motivationally from eighth-grade algebra placement, placing previously average- and low-performing students in algebra can potentially undermine their motivation for mathematics.

MSPnet Location: Library >> MSP Papers
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/29142


8. "Computational Pedagogy: Fostering a New Method of Teaching," Osman Yasar, Peter Veronesi, Jose Maliekal, Leigh J. Little, Sounthone E. Vattana, Ibrahim Halil Yeter, ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, June 2016.

"Teaching with technology still remains as a challenge. Making judicious choices of when, what and how specific tools and pedagogies to use in the teaching of a topic can be improved with the help of curriculum inventories, training, and practices but as new and more capable technologies arrive, such resources and experience do not often transfer to new circumstances. This article presents a case study in which computational modeling and simulation technology (CMST) is used to improve technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) of teachers. We report findings of a summer training program for both preservice and in-service teachers in the Northeastern United States. CMST has shown to be effective on both teaching and learning. Results show that it helps teachers to integrate technology into their teaching in a more permanent, constructive, and tool-independent way. It has also shown to improve student learning in a constructive fashion by first enabling deductive introduction of a topic from a general simplistic framework and then guiding the learner to inductively discover underlying STEM principles through experimentation."

MSPnet Location: Library >> MSP Papers
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/29399


9. "Research-Practice Partnerships in Education: Outcomes, Dynamics, and Open Questions," Cynthia E. Coburn, William R. Penuel, Educational Researcher, February 2016.

"Policymakers, funders, and researchers today view research-practice partnerships (RPPs) as a promising approach for expanding the role of research in improving educational practice. Although studies in other fields provide evidence of the potential for RPPs, studies in education are few. This article provides a review of available evidence of the outcomes and dynamics of RPPs in education and related fields. It then outlines a research agenda for the study of RPPs that can guide funders' investments and help developing partnerships succeed."

MSPnet Location: Library >> MSP Papers
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/29131


10. "Supporting Integrated STEM In The Elementary Classroom: A Professional Development Approach Centered On An Engineering Design Challenge," Anne T. Estapa, Kristina M. Tank, International Journal of STEM Education, March 2017.

"Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education is becoming more prevalent at the elementary level, and there has been a push to focus on the integration between the STEM disciplines. Researchers within this study sought to understand the extent to which triads composed of a classroom teacher, student teacher, and an engineering fellow were able to use the context of an engineering design challenge to integrate and incorporate STEM concepts into the elementary classroom. Using a content analysis approach, researchers analyzed STEM integration across four phases of learning: professional development workshop, lesson plan, classroom enactment, and post-lesson reflection."

MSPnet Location: Library >> MSP Papers
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/31774


Most Popular Webinars
1. "The Current State of K-12 Computer Science Education in the US," presented by Jeanne Century and Sarah Wille, March 2015.

Momentum is growing around expanding computing opportunities for students. Organizations like the National Science Foundation and the non-profit Code.org are working to improve computer science educational opportunities for all students, but especially females and underrepresented minorities in the discipline. Still, despite that work and the work of many others, opportunities for students to learn computer science and what it is are relatively scarce. This webinar will provide participants with an overview of what is currently happening in K-12 computer science education now and areas for future educational research and development. Researchers from Outlier Research & Evaluation at CEMSE at the University of Chicago will provide examples from their research and evaluation work including a current NSF-funded research project (the BASICS Study) that focuses on identifying key supports for and barriers to implementing introductory computer science in large school districts


2. "How to Design 3D Formative Assessments for NGSS," presented by William Penuel and Philip Bell, February 2017.

Both the Framework for K-12 Science Education (NRC, 2012) and the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Lead States, 2013) require new assessments of science proficiency as an integrated understanding of disciplinary core ideas, science and engineering practices, and crosscutting concepts. Though many science teachers, district leaders, and state science supervisors are tasked with developing these new assessments, there is a need for both templates to guide design and examples of good “three-dimensional” assessments to draw upon (NRC, 2013). In this workshop, we will present and illustrate applications of two tools for integrating science and engineering practices and crosscutting concepts into assessments for classroom use. We will also discuss strategies for integrating supports for emerging bilingual students into formative assessment tools and practices.


3. "District & School Implementation of NGSS Through Curriculum Adaptation & Development," presented by Philip Bell and Kerri Wingert, January 2017.

Bell and Wingert, from the Research+Practice Collaboratory, will share ideas, lessons learned, and resources from design partnerships that have been implementing the new vision for K-12 science education. Many of these resources are housed in a collection of open education resources called STEM Teaching Tools (http://stemteachingtools.org) and also at http://researchandpractice.org. They will outline how a curriculum adaptation approach to professional development can help teachers understand and implement aspects of the new vision while developing equity-focused instructional materials to support the learning goals of NGSS. These are district-level efforts that seek to engage all students, especially emerging bilingual students, through curriculum adaptation, the development of formative assessments, and the use of discourse strategies. They will highlight how research-practice partnerships between school districts, education researchers, and scientists/engineers can support this kind of implementation work.


Most Popular MSP/STEM+C Videos from the STEM for All Video Showcases

Innovators Developing Accessible Tools for Astronomy, 2019.

Presented by: Kate Meredith, Bret Feranchak, Santiago Gasca, Alexandra Grossi, Kathy Gustavson, Jim Hammerman, Eric Hochberg, Tim Spuck, & Annie Wilson

SciGirls Code: A National Connected Learning CS Model, 2018.

Presented by: Joan Freese, Sarah Carter, Katie Hessen, & Cassandra Scharber

Learning Trajectories for Everyday Computing (LTEC), 2016.

Presented by: Andy Isaacs, Maya Israel, & George Reese