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MSP News: STEM Learning Experiences for Girls and Women of Color

January 10, 2019


NEWS IN BRIEF


Announcement
Horizon Research, Inc. releases new report: Report of the 2018 NSSME+, details the results of a survey of 7,600 science, mathematics, and computer science teachers in schools across the United States. Areas addressed include: teacher backgrounds and beliefs; science, mathematics, and computer science professional development; science, mathematics, and computer science courses; instructional objectives and activities; instructional resources; and factors affecting instruction.

New in Library
1. "How Do Middle School Girls of Color Develop STEM Identities? Middle School Girls’ Participation in Science Activities and Identification with STEM Careers," Hosun Kan, Angela Calabrese Barton, Edna Tan, Sandra D. Simpkins, Hyang‐yon Rhee, Chandler Turner, Science Education, December 2018.
2. "Black Girls Speak STEM: Counterstories of Informal and Formal Learning Experiences," Natalie S. King, Rose M. Pringle, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, October 2018.
3. "Black Women’s and Girls’ Persistence in the P–20 Mathematics Pipeline: Two Decades of Children, Youth, and Adult Education Research," Nicole M. Joseph, Meseret Hailu, Denise Boston, Review of Research in Education, June 2017.
4. "Digital Youth Divas: Exploring Narrative-Driven Curriculum to Spark Middle School Girls’ Interest in Computational Activities," Nichole Pinkard, Sheena Erete, Caitlin K. Martin, Maxine McKinney de Royston, Journal of the Learning Sciences, 2017.
5. "Out of School and Into Stem: Supporting Girls of Color Through Culturally Relevant Enrichment," Jemimah L. Young, Jamaal R. Young, Noelle A. Paufler, Journal of Interdisciplinary Teacher Leadership, 2017.

2018 STEM for All Video Showcase
This week we feature two videos from the 2018 STEM for All Video Showcase that highlight STEM learning experiences for girls and women of color.

We invite you to present at the 2019 STEM for All Video Showcase, which will take place May 13 - 20, 2019. For more information, go to http://stemforall2019.videohall.com

Title: Helping Mentors Leverage Interest and Engagement in STEM

Presenter(s): Denise Nacu, Sheena Erete, Evelyn Flores, & Nichole Pinkard

Title: STEAM Equity in the Bay, RECESS 2.0

Presenter(s): Christine Boynton



DETAILS BELOW


Announcement
Horizon Research, Inc. releases new report: Report of the 2018 NSSME+, details the results of a survey of 7,600 science, mathematics, and computer science teachers in schools across the United States. Areas addressed include: teacher backgrounds and beliefs; science, mathematics, and computer science professional development; science, mathematics, and computer science courses; instructional objectives and activities; instructional resources; and factors affecting instruction.


New in Library
1. "How Do Middle School Girls of Color Develop STEM Identities? Middle School Girls’ Participation in Science Activities and Identification with STEM Careers," Hosun Kan, Angela Calabrese Barton, Edna Tan, Sandra D. Simpkins, Hyang‐yon Rhee, Chandler Turner, Science Education, December 2018.

"This study explores ways to support girls of color in forming their senses of selves in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) during the middle school years. Guided by social practice theory, we analyzed a large data set of survey responses (n=1,821) collected at five middle schools in low-income communities across four states in the United States. Analyses focus on the extent to which key constructs that inform girls' development of senses of self and relations among those indicators of STEM identities varied by their race/ethnicity. Though the means of indicators sometimes varied across racial/ethnic groups, multigroup structural equation modeling analyses indicate no significant racial/ethnic differences in the relations of STEM identities, suggesting that similar supports would be equally effective for all girls during the middle school years. Girls' self-perception in relation to science was the strongest predictor of their identification with STEM-related careers, and this self-perception was positively and distinctively associated with their experiences with science at home, outside of school, and in school science classes. This study argues for strategically expanding girls' experiences with science across multiple settings during middle school in a way that increases their positive self-perception in and with STEM."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33727


2. "Black Girls Speak STEM: Counterstories of Informal and Formal Learning Experiences," Natalie S. King, Rose M. Pringle, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, October 2018.

"This study presents the interpretations and perceptions of Black girls who participated in I AM STEM--a community-based informal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) program. Using narrative inquiry, participants generated detailed accounts of their informal and formal STEM learning experiences. Critical race methodology informed this research to portray the dynamic and complex experiences of girls of color, whose stories have historically been silenced and misrepresented. The data sources for this qualitative study included individual interviews, student reflection journals, samples of student work, and researcher memos, which were triangulated to produce six robust counterstories. Excerpts of the counterstories are presented in this article. The major findings of this research revealed that I AM STEM ignited an interest in STEM learning through field trips and direct engagement in scientific phenomena that allowed the girls to become agentic in continuing their engagement in STEM activities throughout the year. This call to awaken the voices of Black girls to speak casts light on their experiences and challenges as STEM learners--from their perspectives. The findings confirm that when credence and counterspaces are given to Black girls, they are poised to reveal their luster toward STEM learning. This study provided a space for Black girls to reflect on their STEM learning experiences, formulate new understandings, and make connections between the informal and formal learning environments within the context of their everyday lives, thus offering a more holistic approach to STEM learning that occurs across settings and over a lifetime."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33728


3. "Black Women’s and Girls’ Persistence in the P–20 Mathematics Pipeline: Two Decades of Children, Youth, and Adult Education Research," Nicole M. Joseph, Meseret Hailu, Denise Boston, Review of Research in Education, June 2017.

"Like other women and girls of color in the U.S. education system, Black women and girls negotiate and integrate multiple marginalized identities in mathematics. As such, this integrative review used critical race theory (CRT) and Black feminism as interpretive frames to explore factors that contribute to Black women's and girls' persistence in the mathematics pipeline and the role these factors play in shaping their academic outcomes. A synthesis of 62 research studies reveals that structural disruptions, community influences, and resilience strategies significantly influence Black women's and girls' persistence in mathematics, and that combined, these factors can culminate into a more robust mathematics identity for Black women and girls. A robust mathematics identity, in turn, is an aspect of self-actualization that is needed for persistence, engagement, and sustained success in the pursuit of a mathematics doctoral degree. New questions, paradigms, and ways of examining the experiences of Black women and girls in mathematics to advance further knowledge that will inform policy are identified and discussed as a future research agenda."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33729


4. "Digital Youth Divas: Exploring Narrative-Driven Curriculum to Spark Middle School Girls’ Interest in Computational Activities," Nichole Pinkard, Sheena Erete, Caitlin K. Martin, Maxine McKinney de Royston, Journal of the Learning Sciences, 2017.

"Women use technology to mediate numerous aspects of their professional and personal lives. Yet, few design and create these technologies given that women, especially women of color, are grossly underrepresented in computer science and engineering courses. Decisions about participation in STEM are frequently made prior to high school, and these decisions are impacted by prior experience, interest, and sense of fit with community. Digital Youth Divas is an out-of-school program that uses narrative stories to launch the creation of digital artifacts and support non-dominant middle school girls' STEM interests and identities through virtual and real-world community. In this article, we discuss the framework of the Digital Youth Divas environment, including our approach to blending narratives into project-based design challenges through on- and offline mechanisms. Results from our pilot year, including the co-design process with the middle school participants, suggest that our narrative-centered, blended learning program design sparks non-dominant girls' interests in STEM activities and disciplinary identification, and has the potential to mediate girls' sense of STEM agency, identities, and interests."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33730


5. "Out of School and Into Stem: Supporting Girls of Color Through Culturally Relevant Enrichment," Jemimah L. Young, Jamaal R. Young, Noelle A. Paufler, Journal of Interdisciplinary Teacher Leadership, 2017.

"Increasing the participation of girls of color in the Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) is a national concern. Due to the persistence of achievement and opportunity gaps, sustaining positive STEM dispositions in girls of color is critical to diversifying the STEM pipeline. Enrichment activities can serve as a means to address persistent gaps in opportunities to learn. The purpose of this article was to explain how teachers could adapt traditional STEM enrichment activities to support girls of color through culturally relevant instructional practices. The three components of culturally relevant pedagogy are utilized to example how to adapt traditional activities to support girls of color in STEM. Examples are presented to foster (1) academic success, (2) cultural competence, and (3) sociopolitical consciousness in girls of color. Greater opportunities for STEM professional development, especially those that help teachers build upon culturally relevant teaching, are needed for both pre- and in-service teachers who desire to serve as teacher leaders in STEM. Implications and suggestions for teacher leaders are presented throughout."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33731


2018 STEM for All Video Showcase
This week we feature two videos from the 2018 STEM for All Video Showcase that highlight STEM learning experiences for girls and women of color.

We invite you to present at the 2019 STEM for All Video Showcase, which will take place May 13 - 20, 2019. For more information, go to http://stemforall2019.videohall.com

Title: Helping Mentors Leverage Interest and Engagement in STEM

Presenter(s): Denise Nacu, Sheena Erete, Evelyn Flores, & Nichole Pinkard

Title: STEAM Equity in the Bay, RECESS 2.0

Presenter(s): Christine Boynton