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MSP News: Addressing Achievement Gaps

August 9, 2018

NEWS IN BRIEF


Announcements
1. The NSF 2026 Idea Machine
An opportunity for researchers, the public and other interested stakeholders to contribute to NSF's mission to support basic research and enable new discoveries that drive the U.S. economy, enhance national security and advance knowledge to sustain the country's global leadership in science and engineering. See Details Below for more information.
2. Upcoming Webinars on NSF DRK-12 Solicitation
8/14/18 at 1pm ET and 9/13/18 at 1pm ET

New in Library
1. "The Relationship Between Test Item Format and Gender Achievement Gaps on Math and ELA Tests in Fourth and Eighth Grades," Sean F. Reardon, Demetra Kalogrides, Erin M. Fahle, Anne Podolsky, Rosalia C. Zarate, Educational Researcher, March 2018.
2. "Will Public Pre-K Really Close Achievement Gaps? Gaps in Prekindergarten Quality Between Students and Across States," Rachel Valentino, American Educational Research Journal, September 2017.
3. "Effects of a Summer Mathematics Intervention for Low-Income Children: A Randomized Experiment," Kathleen Lynch, James S. Kim, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, March 2017.
4. "The Gap Within the Gap: Using Longitudinal Data to Understand Income Differences in Educational Outcomes," Katherine Michelmore, Susan Dynarski, AERA Open, February 2017.
5. "Kids Today: The Rise in Children’s Academic Skills at Kindergarten Entry," Daphna Bassok, Scott Latham, Educational Researcher, January 2017.

2018 STEM for All Video Showcase
This week we feature two videos from the 2018 STEM for All Video Showcase that address achievement gaps.

Title: CHISPA! Children Investigating Science w/ Parents & Afterschool

Presenter(s): Cheryl Juarez, Cecilia Garibay, Juliana Ospina Cano, Jose Rodriguez, & Rebecca Teasdale

Title: SciGirls Snapshots: Explicit Gender Equity

Presenter(s): Leah Defenbaugh, Barbara Billington, & Alex Dexheimer



DETAILS BELOW


Announcements
1. The NSF 2026 Idea Machine
The NSF 2026 Idea Machine is a competition to help set the U.S. agenda for fundamental research in science and engineering. Participants can earn prizes and receive public recognition by suggesting the pressing research questions that need to be answered in the coming decade, the next set of "Big Ideas" for future investment by the National Science Foundation (NSF). It's an opportunity for researchers, the public and other interested stakeholders to contribute to NSF's mission to support basic research and enable new discoveries that drive the U.S. economy, enhance national security and advance knowledge to sustain the country's global leadership in science and engineering.

For more Information:
www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/nsf2026ideamachine/index.jsp

Download Flyer:
www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/nsf2026ideamachine/toolkit/NSFIdeaMachine.pdf


2. Upcoming Webinars on NSF DRK-12 Solicitation
Join NSF program officers for an informational webinar on the Discovery Research preK-12 Solicitation (17-584) due November 14, 2018. There are two webinar opportunities: August 14, 2018 at 1pm ET and September 13, 2018 at 1pm ET.

To Register:
http://cadrek12.org/informational-webinar-dr-k-12-solicitation-17-584

NSF Proposal Toolkit:
http://cadrek12.org/resources/nsf-proposal-writing-resources

See DRK-12 Project Videos from the 2018 STEM for All Video Showcase:

http://stemforall2018.videohall.com/presentations#/program/id=p_drk_12


New in Library
1. "The Relationship Between Test Item Format and Gender Achievement Gaps on Math and ELA Tests in Fourth and Eighth Grades," Sean F. Reardon, Demetra Kalogrides, Erin M. Fahle, Anne Podolsky, Rosalia C. Zarate, Educational Researcher, March 2018.

"Prior research suggests that males outperform females, on average, on multiple-choice items compared to their relative performance on constructed-response items. This paper characterizes the extent to which gender achievement gaps on state accountability tests across the United States are associated with those tests' item formats. Using roughly 8 million fourth- and eighth-grade students' scores on state assessments, we estimate state- and district-level math and reading male-female achievement gaps. We find that the estimated gaps are strongly associated with the proportions of the test scores based on multiple-choice and constructed-response questions on state accountability tests, even when controlling for gender achievement gaps as measured by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) or Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) assessments, which have the same item format across states. We find that test item format explains approximately 25% of the variation in gender achievement gaps among states."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33576


2. "Will Public Pre-K Really Close Achievement Gaps? Gaps in Prekindergarten Quality Between Students and Across States," Rachel Valentino, American Educational Research Journal, September 2017.

"Publicly funded pre-K is often touted as a means to narrow achievement gaps, but this goal is less likely to be achieved if poor and/or minority children do not, at a minimum, attend equal quality pre-K as their non-poor, non-minority peers. In this paper, I find large "quality gaps" in public pre-K between poor, minority students and non-poor, non-minority students, ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 SD on a range of classroom observational measures. I also find that even after adjusting for several classroom characteristics, significant and sizable quality gaps remain. Finally, I find much between-state variation in gap magnitudes and that state-level quality gaps are related to state-level residential segregation. These findings are particularly troubling if a goal of public pre-K is to minimize inequality."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33577


3. "Effects of a Summer Mathematics Intervention for Low-Income Children: A Randomized Experiment," Kathleen Lynch, James S. Kim, Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, March 2017.

"Prior research suggests that summer learning loss among low-income children contributes to income-based gaps in achievement and educational attainment. We present results from a randomized experiment of a summer mathematics program conducted in a large, high-poverty urban public school district. Children in the third to ninth grade (N = 263) were randomly assigned to an offer of an online summer mathematics program, the same program plus a free laptop computer, or the control group. Being randomly assigned to the program plus laptop condition caused children to experience significantly higher reported levels of summer home mathematics engagement relative to their peers in the control group. Treatment and control children performed similarly on distal measures of academic achievement. We discuss implications for future research."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33578


4. "The Gap Within the Gap: Using Longitudinal Data to Understand Income Differences in Educational Outcomes," Katherine Michelmore, Susan Dynarski, AERA Open, February 2017.

"Gaps in educational achievement between high- and low-income children are growing. Administrative data sets maintained by states and districts lack information about income but do indicate whether a student is eligible for subsidized school meals. We leverage the longitudinal structure of these data sets to develop a new measure of economic disadvantage. Half of eighth graders in Michigan are eligible for a subsidized meal, but just 14% have been eligible for subsidized meals in every grade since kindergarten. These children score 0.94 standard deviations below those who are never eligible for meal subsidies and 0.23 below those who are occasionally eligible. There is a negative, linear relationship between grades spent in economic disadvantage and eighth-grade test scores. This is not an exposure effect; the relationship is almost identical in third-grade, before children have been exposed to varying years of economic disadvantage. Survey data show that the number of years that a child will spend eligible for subsidized lunch is negatively correlated with her or his current household income. Years eligible for subsidized meals can therefore be used as a reasonable proxy for income. Our proposed measure can be used to estimate heterogeneous effects in program evaluations, to improve value-added calculations, and to better target resources."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33579


5. "Kids Today: The Rise in Children’s Academic Skills at Kindergarten Entry," Daphna Bassok, Scott Latham, Educational Researcher, January 2017.

"Private and public investments in early childhood education have expanded significantly in recent years. Despite this heightened investment, we have little empirical evidence on whether children today enter school with different skills than they did in the late nineties. Using two large, nationally representative data sets, this article documents how students entering kindergarten in 2010 compare to those who entered in 1998 in terms of their teacher-reported math, literacy, and behavioral skills. Our results indicate that students in the more recent cohort entered kindergarten with stronger math and literacy skills. Results for behavioral outcomes were mixed. Increases in academic skills over this period were particularly pronounced among Black children. Implications for policy are discussed."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33580


2018 STEM for All Video Showcase
This week we feature two videos from the 2018 STEM for All Video Showcase that address achievement gaps.

Title: CHISPA! Children Investigating Science w/ Parents & Afterschool

Presenter(s): Cheryl Juarez, Cecilia Garibay, Juliana Ospina Cano, Jose Rodriguez, & Rebecca Teasdale

Title: SciGirls Snapshots: Explicit Gender Equity

Presenter(s): Leah Defenbaugh, Barbara Billington, & Alex Dexheimer