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MSP News: Classroom and Large‐Scale Assessments

June 13, 2018


NEWS IN BRIEF


Announcement
May/June 2018 NSF Proposal & Award Policy Newsletter

New in Library
This week we feature a special issue of Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice, entitled "Strengthening the Connections Between Classroom and Large‐Scale Assessments." This issue explores the challenges and opportunities of connecting classroom and large‐scale summative assessments to better serve teaching and learning in schools and school districts. It features two focused articles and complements them with four commentaries and additional responses to commentaries.

1. "Making Measurement Important for Education: The Crucial Role of Classroom Assessment," Mark Wilson, Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice, Spring 2018.

2. "Using Learning and Motivation Theories to Coherently Link Formative Assessment, Grading Practices, and Large‐Scale Assessment," Lorrie A. Shepard, William R. Penuel, James W. Pellegrino, Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice, Spring 2018.

These 2 library items contains links to the following related content:
Commentaries
Rejoinders


DETAILS BELOW


Announcement
May/June 2018 NSF Proposal & Award Policy Newsletter
Newsletter Content:

  • Draft PAPPG Published in the Federal Register
  • Proposal Submission in Research.gov is Here
  • New Account Management System
  • Revision of NSF Award Terms and Conditions
  • Public Access Expansion Repository
  • Faculty Compensation – A Reminder

Read Full NSF Newsletter >>


New in Library
1. "Making Measurement Important for Education: The Crucial Role of Classroom Assessment," Mark Wilson, Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice, Spring 2018.

"This article is a written version of the Presidential Address given at the annual meeting of the National Council on Measurement in Education (NCME) in April 2017. It is a call to NCME members (and others who read this, of course) to rebalance their focus so that classroom assessments are seen as being at least as important as large-scale assessments for education (in fact, in my view, they are more important). The article reviews research literature about the effects of classroom assessment to establish its importance for education. Then, the roles of large-scale assessment are reviewed, and, in particular, it is noted how these can have negative results when the large-scale assessments are not well aligned with sound curriculum and instructional and assessment practices grounded in theories of learning. In the next two sections (a) the idea of a learning progression is described as a way to facilitate the coherence between classroom and large-scale assessment and (b) the idea of a "roadmap" is described, being the assessment components of the learning progression. This is followed by a description of an example of such a roadmap, developed for the Assessing Data Modeling and Statistical Reasoning project using the BEAR Assessment System (BAS). Finally, a concluding discussion reviews the ways that the coherence between large-scale and classroom assessments can be achieved using the BAS, and hence make measurement more important for education."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33519


2. "Using Learning and Motivation Theories to Coherently Link Formative Assessment, Grading Practices, and Large‐Scale Assessment," Lorrie A. Shepard, William R. Penuel, James W. Pellegrino, Educational Measurement: Issues and Practice, Spring 2018.

"To support equitable and ambitious teaching practices, classroom assessment design must be grounded in a research-based theory of learning. Compared to other theories, sociocultural theory offers a more powerful, integrative account of how motivational aspects of learning-such as self-regulation, self-efficacy, sense of belonging, and identity-are completely entwined with cognitive development. Instead of centering assessment within systems that support use of interim and end-of-year standardized tests, we argue for a vision of formative assessment based on discipline-specific tasks and questions that can provide qualitative insights about student experience and thinking, including their identification with disciplinary practices. At the same time, to be consistent with a productive formative assessment culture, grading policies should avoid using points and grades "to motivate" students but should create opportunities for students to use feedback to improve their work. We argue for districts as the locus for the design of such coherent curriculum, instruction, and assessment activity systems because districts have responsibility for curriculum, teacher professional development, and equity; and districts allocate resources for textbooks and assessment."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33520


These library items contains links to the following related content:
Commentaries
To further round out the connections between classroom and large‐scale assessments, and to highlight the commonalities and distinctions between the two target articles, Margaret Heritage, Susan Brookhart, Scott Marion, and Dylan Wiliam provide their commentaries.

  • "Learning Is the Primary Source of Coherence in Assessment," Susan M. Brookhart, 2018.
  • "Making Assessment Work for Teachers," Margaret Heritage, 2018.
  • "How Can Assessment Support Learning? A Response to Wilson and Shepard, Penuel, and Pellegrino," Dylan Wiliam, 2018.
  • "The Opportunities and Challenges of a Systems Approach to Assessment," Scott F. Marion, 2018.

Rejoinders
The authors of the target articles had the opportunity to read the collection of commentaries and respond.

  • "Classroom Assessment: Continuing the Discussion," Mark Wilson, 2018.
  • "Classroom Assessment Principles to Support Learning and Avoid the Harms of Testing," Lorrie A. Shepard, William R. Penuel, James W. Pellegrino