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MSP News: New NSF STEM+C Program Description and Call for Proposals

April 12, 2018


NEWS IN BRIEF


Announcement
1. New NSF STEM+C Program Description & Call for Proposals
2018 Proposal Deadline: 7/2/18

MSPnet Academy
1. RSVP Now! Upcoming MSPnet Academy Webinar: Students as Citizen Scientists; Participation in Real Science Research as a More Effective Method to Learn STEM
Date: April 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM (Eastern)
Presenters: W. Robert Midden and Lauren Birney

New in Library
1. "Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Experts and Novices - What Knowledge Do They ActivateWhen Analyzing Science Lessons?," Matthias Krepf, Wilfried Plöger, Daniel Scholl, Andreas Seifert, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, January 2018.
2. "An Exploration of the Interactions Among the Components of an Experienced Elementary Science Teacher's Pedagogical Content Knowledge," Yilmaz Soysal, Educational Studies, May 2017.
3. "Exploring the Relationship Between Secondary Science Teachers’ Subject Matter Knowledge and Knowledge of Student Conceptions While Teaching Evolution by Natural Selection," Margaret M. Lucero, Anthony J. Petrosino, Cesar Delgado, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 2017.
4. "Exploring the Relationship Between Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) and Sustainability of an Innovative Science Teaching Approach," Jee Kyung Suh, Soonhye Park, Teaching and Teacher Education, May 2017.
5. "Relating Teacher PCK and Teacher Practice Using Classroom Observation," Erik Barendsen, Ineke Henze, Research in Science Education, September 2017.


DETAILS BELOW


Announcement
1. New NSF STEM+C Program Description & Call for Proposals
A new Program Description (PD) for the STEM + Computing K-12 Education (STEM+C) program has been posted (18-005Y); see the announcement.

NSF is trying a new approach to requesting and handling proposals, and the STEM+C program is leading the effort. Here is some clarifying guidance on this new process:

  1. There is no solicitation. Proposals are to be structured and submitted according to NSF’s Proposal and Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG).
  2. There are no set funding categories, strands, project durations, or funding limits. Follow the Proposal and Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) guidelines for Full Proposals, Supplements to Awards, Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REUs), and EAGERs. Set reasonable project goals, costs, and project duration for the nature and scope of the proposed project.
  3. There is no submission deadline. You may submit STEM+C proposals at any time for review. If you want to be considered for funding during the current fiscal year (FY18), you must submit a proposal by July 2, 2018.
  4. Guidance on intellectual direction: Please keep in mind the full intent of the posted STEM+C Program Description:
    The STEM+C Program focuses on research and development of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary approaches to the integration of computing within STEM teaching and learning for preK-12 students in both formal and informal settings. The STEM+C program supports research on how students learn to think computationally to solve interdisciplinary problems in science and mathematics.

Please refer to the STEM+C Program Description and FAQs that have been posted for guidance.


Funding for this program is currently available. Submit your proposal by July 2, 2018 if you wish to be considered for funding during the current fiscal year that ends in September.

Learn more: https://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=505006


MSPnet Academy
1. RSVP Now! Upcoming MSPnet Academy Webinar: Students as Citizen Scientists; Participation in Real Science Research as a More Effective Method to Learn STEM
Date: April 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM (Eastern)
Presenters: W. Robert Midden and Lauren Birney

Description: This webinar will summarize findings from two MSP projects that involve elementary and middle school students participating in real science research that is integrated into their classroom instruction. One project, titled Curriculum and Community Enterprise for the Restoration of New York Harbor with New York City Public Schools involves over forty schools, eighty teachers, and 8,640 students in densely populated, low-income urban areas where resources and access to natural areas are limited. Students study New York harbor and the extensive watershed that empties into it, and they conduct field research in support of restoring native oyster habitats, building on the existing Billion Oyster Project of the New York Harbor School. A number of partners play key roles in the project including Pace University, the New York City Department of Education, the Columbia University Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, the New York Academy of Sciences, the New York Harbor Foundation, and the New York Aquarium. The project includes five interrelated components: A teacher education curriculum, a student learning curriculum, a digital platform for project resources, an aquarium exhibit, and an afterschool STEM mentoring program. The second project, titled iEvolve with STEM, involves more than 3,000 students and 75 teachers in two medium-size, Midwestern school districts, one low-income urban district and one neighboring district with mixed demographics. Each grade level participates in a different research project that is aligned with some of the state learning standards. Lessons have been developed that integrate the students’ research into all four core academic subject areas: science, math, social studies, and language arts. Professional scientists affiliated with a number of partners lead the research projects and provide scientific consultation to ensure the scientific validity of students’ research and to assist with their contributions to national and international citizen science research projects. This presentation will provide a summary of the key features of these projects and will report what has been found regarding the factors and resources that make it possible for students and teachers to participate in science research in meaningful and successful ways as well as the outcomes and benefits from integrating this into classroom instruction.


New in Library
1. "Pedagogical Content Knowledge of Experts and Novices - What Knowledge Do They ActivateWhen Analyzing Science Lessons?," Matthias Krepf, Wilfried Plöger, Daniel Scholl, Andreas Seifert, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, January 2018.

"In the current debate on pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), the term is used to refer to the context-specific knowledge that teachers activate when reflecting on practice. Against the background of this debate, we conducted an empirical study and sought to answer the question of which knowledge experts and novices activated in assessing a videotaped lesson in relation to its effectiveness for learning. Our assumption was that the participants activate their PCK as a blending of content knowledge (CK) and pedagogical knowledge (PK) as suggested by Shulman's amalgam thesis. The participants (9 experts and 9 novices) were shown a lesson on optics, in which the law of refraction (Snell's law) was being studied. In a subsequent interview, the participants were asked to analyze the observed lesson. A qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the interviews showed that experts activated both CK and PK intensively and in this respect they differed significantly from novices. Further analysis of the expert statements also proved that they do not activate their CK and PK in isolation, but instead combine both kinds of knowledge together, in line with Shulman's amalgam thesis."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33446


2. "An Exploration of the Interactions Among the Components of an Experienced Elementary Science Teacher's Pedagogical Content Knowledge," Yilmaz Soysal, Educational Studies, May 2017.

"This study had two purposes: to explore the components of the pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of an experienced elementary science teacher and to reveal the presumed interactions among these components. A naturalistic inquiry was conducted as a single case study in which in-depth qualitative data were gathered through semi-structured interview questions. After the theory-based and data-driven analysis of the qualitative data, the verbal communication was quantitated into numerical data for the enumerative analysis. The results revealed that the teacher's knowledge of students' understanding and difficulties, knowledge of the elementary science curriculum and knowledge of instructional strategies and representations were found to be mostly intersected PCK components, whereas orientations towards teaching science and knowledge of assessment in science had limited connections to the other components. Further discussions and context-based suggestions are given regarding professional development programmes."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33447


3. "Exploring the Relationship Between Secondary Science Teachers’ Subject Matter Knowledge and Knowledge of Student Conceptions While Teaching Evolution by Natural Selection," Margaret M. Lucero, Anthony J. Petrosino, Cesar Delgado, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 2017.

"The fundamental scientific concept of evolution occurring by natural selection is home to many deeply held alternative conceptions and considered difficult to teach. Science teachers' subject matter knowledge (SMK) and the pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) component of knowledge of students' conceptions (KOSC) can be valuable resources for helping students learn difficult science concepts such as natural selection. However, little research exists that explores the relationship between science teachers' SMK and their KOSC on evolution by natural selection. This study explores the relationship between SMK and KOSC through the participation of four biology teachers at a single high school and thus deepens our understanding of the teacher knowledge base. Main data sources are teacher interviews in which each teacher answered SMK-type questions and predicted what their students' most common alternative conceptions were by using the Conceptual Inventory of Natural Selection (CINS). Other data sources include student responses on the CINS and classroom observations. Findings revealed relative independence between SMK and KOSC, although there is likely a minimum threshold of SMK to recognize student alternative conceptions. However, our work also revealed ways in which teachers were not leveraging their KOSC and suggest potential avenues for future inquiry. "

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33448


4. "Exploring the Relationship Between Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) and Sustainability of an Innovative Science Teaching Approach," Jee Kyung Suh, Soonhye Park, Teaching and Teacher Education, May 2017.

"This study identified common patterns in Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) of three exemplary teachers who have voluntarily sustained the implementation of an argument-based inquiry approach, and explored how those patterns relate to their sustained implementation. Results indicate that teachers' orientations aligned with argument-based inquiry, especially as to how students learn, are essential for their sustained implementation. Their orientations are strongly connected with two other components of PCK (i.e., Knowledge of Student Understanding and Knowledge of Instructional Strategies and Representations), which mutually interact with the sustainability of the implementation."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33449


5. "Relating Teacher PCK and Teacher Practice Using Classroom Observation," Erik Barendsen, Ineke Henze, Research in Science Education, September 2017.

"Science teachers' pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) has been researched in many studies, yet little empirical evidence has been found to determine how this knowledge actually informs teachers' actions in the classroom. To complement previous quantitative studies, there is a need for more qualitative studies to investigate the relationship between teacher knowledge (as formulated by the teacher) and classroom practice, especially in the context of an educational innovation. In this study we explored a possible way to investigate this relationship in an in-depth and systematic fashion. To this end, we conducted a case study with a chemistry teacher in the context of the implementation of a context-based science curriculum in The Netherlands. The teacher's PCK was captured using the Content Representation form by Loughran, Mulhall, and Berry. We used an observation table to monitor classroom interactions in such a way that the observations could be related to specific elements of teachers' PCK. Thus, we were able to give a detailed characterization of the correspondences and differences between the teacher's personal PCK and classroom practice. Such an elaborate description turned out to be a useful basis for discussing mechanisms explaining the relationship between teachers' knowledge and teachers' actions."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33450