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MSP News: Project-Based Learning

March 29, 2018


NEWS IN BRIEF


MSPnet Academy
1. RSVP Now! Upcoming MSPnet Academy Webinar: Students as Citizen Scientists; Participation in Real Science Research as a More Effective Method to Learn STEM
Date: April 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM (Eastern)
Presenters: W. Robert Midden, Lauren Birney

New STEM+C Paper
1. "Design Principles for Thriving in Our Digital World: A High School Computer Science Course," George Veletsianos, Bradley Beth, Calvin Lin, Gregory Russell, Project Engage, Journal of Educational Computing Research, 2016.

New in Resources
1. "Composting: A Problem, Place, or Project? Using the PBL Trifecta (PBL3) in the Classroom," Mark Williams, Ana Houseal, Science Scope, February 2018.
2. "The Activity Summary Board," Israel Touitou, Stephen Barry, Tom Bielik, Barbara Schneider, Joseph Krajcik, The Science Teacher, March 2018.
3. "Why Do Fishermen Need Forests? Developing a Project-Based Learning Unit With an Engaging Driving Question," Tom Bielik, Daniel Damelin, Joseph Krajcik, Science Scope, February 2018.

New in Library
1. "Examining the Potential of Computer Science and Making for Supporting Project-Based Learning," Samuel Severance, Susan Codere, Emily Miller, Deborah Peek-Brown, Joseph Krajcik, George Lucas Educational Foundation, July 2017.
2. "Project-Based Learning: A Literature Review," Barbara Condliffe, Janet Quint, Mary G. Visher, Michael R. Bangser, Sonia Drohojowska, Larissa Saco, Elizabeth Nelson, George Lucas Educational Foundation, October 2017.

Announcement
1. NSF CAREER Program Webinar
May 15, 2018 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

DETAILS BELOW


MSPnet Academy
1. RSVP Now! Upcoming MSPnet Academy Webinar: Students as Citizen Scientists; Participation in Real Science Research as a More Effective Method to Learn STEM
Date: April 24, 2018 at 3:00 PM (Eastern)
Presenters: W. Robert Midden, Lauren Birney

Description: This webinar will summarize findings from two MSP projects that involve elementary and middle school students participating in real science research that is integrated into their classroom instruction. One project, titled Curriculum and Community Enterprise for the Restoration of New York Harbor with New York City Public Schools involves over forty schools, eighty teachers, and 8,640 students in densely populated, low-income urban areas where resources and access to natural areas are limited. Students study New York harbor and the extensive watershed that empties into it, and they conduct field research in support of restoring native oyster habitats, building on the existing Billion Oyster Project of the New York Harbor School. A number of partners play key roles in the project including Pace University, the New York City Department of Education, the Columbia University Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, the New York Academy of Sciences, the New York Harbor Foundation, and the New York Aquarium. The project includes five interrelated components: A teacher education curriculum, a student learning curriculum, a digital platform for project resources, an aquarium exhibit, and an afterschool STEM mentoring program. The second project, titled iEvolve with STEM, involves more than 3,000 students and 75 teachers in two medium-size, Midwestern school districts, one low-income urban district and one neighboring district with mixed demographics. Each grade level participates in a different research project that is aligned with some of the state learning standards. Lessons have been developed that integrate the students’ research into all four core academic subject areas: science, math, social studies, and language arts. Professional scientists affiliated with a number of partners lead the research projects and provide scientific consultation to ensure the scientific validity of students’ research and to assist with their contributions to national and international citizen science research projects. This presentation will provide a summary of the key features of these projects and will report what has been found regarding the factors and resources that make it possible for students and teachers to participate in science research in meaningful and successful ways as well as the outcomes and benefits from integrating this into classroom instruction.


New STEM+C Paper
1. "Design Principles for Thriving in Our Digital World: A High School Computer Science Course," George Veletsianos, Bradley Beth, Calvin Lin, Gregory Russell, Project Engage, Journal of Educational Computing Research, 2016.

"Thriving in Our Digital World is a technology-enhanced dual enrollment course introducing high school students to computer science through project- and problem based learning. This article describes the evolution of the course and five lessons learned during the design, development, implementation, and iteration of the course from its first through third year of implementation. The design principles that we describe have guided our design endeavors and may be helpful to instructional designers, learning technologists, and others who are engaged in the design and development of in situ interventions to improve the teaching and learning of computer science."

MSPnet Location: Library >> MSP Papers
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33429


New in Resources
1. "Composting: A Problem, Place, or Project? Using the PBL Trifecta (PBL3) in the Classroom," Mark Williams, Ana Houseal, Science Scope, February 2018.

"Combine problem-, place-, and phenomenon-based learning to engage students in a composting project. The qualities commonly found in any PBL approach allow students to apply what they learned, follow through on a project, and get the real-world experiences and skills they need for the rest of their lives."

MSPnet Location: Resources >> MSP Toolbox
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33422


2. "The Activity Summary Board," Israel Touitou, Stephen Barry, Tom Bielik, Barbara Schneider, Joseph Krajcik, The Science Teacher, March 2018.

"Use this organizational tool to help student scientists make sense of a phenomenon or problem."

MSPnet Location: Resources >> MSP Toolbox
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33423


3. "Why Do Fishermen Need Forests? Developing a Project-Based Learning Unit With an Engaging Driving Question," Tom Bielik, Daniel Damelin, Joseph Krajcik, Science Scope, February 2018.

"Use driving questions and anchoring phenomena to capture students' curiosity. PBL units drive student learning by guiding students to answer important questions, such as the driving question discussed here, helping them build usable knowledge of the three-dimensional components of the PE. Teachers and practitioners can benefit from these curriculum design ideas by considering a driving question to develop science lessons and designing curricular materials that are coherent, engaging, and support student exploration of phenomena."

MSPnet Location: Resources >> MSP Toolbox
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33424


New in Library
1. "Examining the Potential of Computer Science and Making for Supporting Project-Based Learning," Samuel Severance, Susan Codere, Emily Miller, Deborah Peek-Brown, Joseph Krajcik, George Lucas Educational Foundation, July 2017.

"In this literature review, we seek to understand in what ways aspects of computer science education and making and makerspaces may support the ambitious vision for science education put forth in A Framework for K-12 Science as carried forward in the Next Generation Science Standards. Specifically, we examine how computer science and making and makerspace approaches may inform a project-based learning approach for supporting three-dimensional science learning at the elementary level. We reviewed the methods and findings of both recently published articles by influential scholars in computer science education and the maker movement and more foundational highly-cited articles pertaining to each approach. Our review found (1) making and makerspace approaches offer students, particularly from historically marginalized demographics, ample agency and opportunities for ownership over their learning but pose significant challenges for implementation at the elementary level at scale within a formal learning context; (2) computer science education, when effectively mediated with tools that lower barriers to entry, can help a range of students engage in meaningful computational thinking practices and may spur their interest in computers prior to more formal computer science education opportunities, yet such an approach will require careful consideration of how to sustain what is being implemented and subsequent computer science opportunities that students see as relevant. Our examination concludes with a discussion of congruencies and incongruences of computer science and making and makerspaces with project-based learning approaches aligned to science reforms, with applications to elementary units within the Lucas Education Foundation supported project, Multiple Literacies in Project-Based Learning."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33425


2. "Project-Based Learning: A Literature Review," Barbara Condliffe, Janet Quint, Mary G. Visher, Michael R. Bangser, Sonia Drohojowska, Larissa Saco, Elizabeth Nelson, George Lucas Educational Foundation, October 2017.

"The concept of project-based learning (PBL) has garnered wide support among a number of K-12 education policy advocates and funders. This working paper builds on and updates a seminal literature review of PBL published in 2000. Focused primarily on articles and studies that have emerged in the 17 years since then, the working paper discusses the principles that underlie PBL, how PBL has been used in K-12 settings, the challenges teachers have confronted in implementing it, how school and district factors influence its adoption, and what is known about its effectiveness in improving students' learning outcomes."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33426


Announcement
1. NSF CAREER Program Webinar
May 15, 2018 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

The NSF CAREER Coordinating Committee hosts a webinar to answer participants' questions about development and submission of proposals to the NSF Faculty Early Career Development Program (CAREER). The webinar will give participants the opportunity to interact with members of the NSF-wide CAREER Coordinating Committee in a question-and-answer format.

In preparation for the webinar, participants are strongly encouraged to consult material available on-line concerning the CAREER program. In particular, the CAREER program web page has a wealth of current information about the program, including:
• the CAREER program solicitation NSF 17-537;
frequently asked questions about the CAREER program;
• and slides from a CAREER program overview.

For more information and instructions to join webinar: https://www.nsf.gov/events/event_summ.jsp?cntn_id=244740