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MSP News: Strategies for Climate Change Education

November 9, 2017


NEWS IN BRIEF


Upcoming MSPnet Academy Webinar
1. RSVP Now! Two Strategies for Climate Change Education
Date: November 16, 2017 at 3:00 PM (Eastern)
Presenter: Brian Drayton (TERC), William Spitzer (New England Aquarium)
To learn more about the NSF funded projects being presented, view these videos & see related papers below.

Title: The Climate Lab: schools as satellite field stations

Presenter(s): Brian Drayton, Evan Dalton, Abe Drayton, Trevor Lloyd-Evans, and Gillian Puttick

Title: Constructive Dialog about Climate Change

Presenter(s): William (Billy) Spitzer, John Anderson, Kate Flinner, John Fraser, and Hannah Pickard

New Papers Related to Upcoming Webinar
1. "Catalyzing Public Engagement With Climate Change Through Informal Science Learning Centers," Nathaniel Geiger, Janet K. Swim, John Fraser, Kate Flinner, Science Communication, 2017.
2. "Angling Toward Solutions in Climate Change Education," John Anderson, Informal Learning Review, February 2016.
3. "Climate Change Education at Nature-Based Museums," Janet K. Swim, Nathaniel Geiger, John Fraser, Nette Pletcher, Curator: The Museum Journal, January 2017.
4. "Climate Change Is Tough to Teach, So Aquariums and Zoos Are Stepping In," Marva Hinton, EdWeek, June 2017.
5. "Co-inventing the Climate Lab: First lessons from an innovative partnership," Brian Drayton, Gillian Puttick, Abe Drayton, Trevor Lloyd-Evans, TERC Hands On!, Spring 2015.

New in Library
1. "Empowering Young Women Through Climate Stewardship: A Lesson about Earth’s Changing Albedo," Natalie Macke, Ilana Char, Samyukta Mahendra Kumar, Brittany Hudson, Ako Matsumura, Sahiba Sikand, The Earth Scientist, Spring 2016.
2. "Carbon Footprints, Carbon Sinks, and Carbon Stewardship: A Partnership Between Informal Educators and Classroom Teachers," Krysta Hougen, Jaime Bunting, The Earth Scientist, Spring 2016.
3. "Student Anti-Idling Campaign: Service Learning in Deed," Dale Glass, The Earth Scientist, Spring 2016.
4. "The Polar Bear Challenge: Local Impact on a Global Issue," Christine Schmitz, The Earth Scientist, Spring 2016.

NSF Announcement
1. Dear Colleague Letter: Principles for the Design of Digital Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Learning Environments (NSF 18-017)
Proposal Deadline: 1/22/18

DETAILS BELOW


Upcoming MSPnet Academy Webinar
1. RSVP Now! Two Strategies for Climate Change Education
Date: November 16, 2017 at 3:00 PM (Eastern)
Presenter: Brian Drayton (TERC), William Spitzer (New England Aquarium)

Description: Brian Drayton from TERC and Billy Spitzer from the New England Aquarium will discuss two complementary strategies for engaging the public in climate change outside of the classroom. Brian will talk about a citizen science effort, and Billy will talk about an initiative to educate the public at informal science centers. Following a brief exposition of each strategy, they will discuss the similarities and differences between these approaches.

To learn more about the NSF funded projects being presented, view these videos & see related papers below.

Title: The Climate Lab: schools as satellite field stations

Presenter(s): Brian Drayton, Evan Dalton, Abe Drayton, Trevor Lloyd-Evans, and Gillian Puttick

Title: Constructive Dialog about Climate Change

Presenter(s): William (Billy) Spitzer, John Anderson, Kate Flinner, John Fraser, and Hannah Pickard


New Papers Related to Upcoming Webinar
1. "Catalyzing Public Engagement With Climate Change Through Informal Science Learning Centers," Nathaniel Geiger, Janet K. Swim, John Fraser, Kate Flinner, Science Communication, 2017.

"Using the head, heart, and hands model, we examined a training program designed to catalyze national public engagement with climate change through informal science learning centers (e.g., aquariums, zoos). Survey data were collected from visitors (N = 7,285) observing 1,101 presentations at 117 U.S. institutions before and after presenters participated in communication training. Visitors who attended posttraining (vs. pretraining) presentations reported greater understanding of climate change (head), hope (heart), and intentions to engage in community action (hands). As hypothesized, results suggested these changes were due to an increase in presenters' discussion of climate change and use of effective communication techniques."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33230


2. "Angling Toward Solutions in Climate Change Education," John Anderson, Informal Learning Review, February 2016.

"This article lays out a brief review of some challenges that make it difficult for educators to address climate change issues, and offers some suggestions based on work of the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI) and the Visualizing Change Project."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33231


3. "Climate Change Education at Nature-Based Museums," Janet K. Swim, Nathaniel Geiger, John Fraser, Nette Pletcher, Curator: The Museum Journal, January 2017.

"The status of climate change education at nature-based museums (i.e., zoos, aquariums and nature centers) was examined, with a particular focus on centers participating in a National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI) leadership training program. Study 1 revealed that, relative to nature-based museums that did not participate in the training, NNOCCI-participating institutions provided resources for staff to work on the topic and professional development programs and were more likely than non-participating museums to be comfortable with and provide climate change education programming. Study 2 confirms these results via visitor reports about the exhibits they observed. Study 2 also reveals that, relative to non-visitors and visitors to non-participating nature-based museums, visitors to NNOCCI-participating nature-based museums were more knowledgeable about and concerned about climate change and ocean acidification, hopeful about their ability to talk about the topic, and likely to engage in climate change actions than those who did not visit these centers. Importantly, results from both studies indicate that nature-based museums, especially NNOCCI participating museums, have an institutional culture supportive of climate science education and suggests that NNOCCI interpreter training programming facilitates this culture which in turn is reflected in visitor engagement."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33232


4. "Climate Change Is Tough to Teach, So Aquariums and Zoos Are Stepping In," Marva Hinton, EdWeek, June 2017.

"This article explains how aquariums and zoos are developing climate-change lessons aimed at giving their visitors a complete picture of the problem and what can be done to solve it."
 
MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33233


5. "Co-inventing the Climate Lab: First lessons from an innovative partnership," Brian Drayton, Gillian Puttick, Abe Drayton, Trevor Lloyd-Evans, TERC Hands On!, Spring 2015.

"How is a Where's Waldo puzzle like a graph depicting fifty years of average temperatures? In both, the key elements to focus on are disguised by an overwhelming amount of visual noise. Despite the apparent jumble of information, each presents discernable patterns. The trick to finding the "signal" among the "noise" is to assemble a large amount of data.
Getting students in the habit of looking for the signal or trend in a data set is the goal of the first activity in a new climate change unit for the Climate Lab, a prototype education program at the Manomet Center for Conservation Sciences. Students begin the activity by looking at Where's Waldo search and find puzzles and consider the following questions:

  • What is the purpose of the game? (Answer - to find Waldo)
  • What is the purpose of everything in the puzzle that is not Waldo? (Answer - to make it hard to find Waldo)
  • What help do we have in finding Waldo? (We know what he looks like, and we know he's there)
  • Based on this picture, would you be able to predict Waldo's location in other pictures? (?)

The activity then progresses as students continue to explore signal vs. noise in the context of weather vs. climate. They examine graphs showing the average annual temperature in Massachusetts over 50 years, first looking at small subsets of data from short periods. They consider several questions and make predictions and then continue their exploration by looking at larger sets of data and how those data sets impact their predictions of future temperature. These initial activities, along with several others focused on ecology and biology, comprise a one-week unit designed to help the Climate Lab participants get the most out of their field observation and data collection work, which is a primary part of the program."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/31844


New in Library
1. "Empowering Young Women Through Climate Stewardship: A Lesson about Earth’s Changing Albedo," Natalie Macke, Ilana Char, Samyukta Mahendra Kumar, Brittany Hudson, Ako Matsumura, Sahiba Sikand, The Earth Scientist, Spring 2016.

"A Climate Stewards Club, as part of the NOAA Climate Stewards Education Project (CSEP), was established as an after-school high school program to empower young women as community leaders who would be then, both willing and capable of addressing their peers and the public about issues related to global climate change. The student club identi- ed the need to support climate literacy in the middle school by providing opportunities for learners to engage in hands-on activities that assisted in student understanding of how Earth's climate system works. The students and their mentor developed an engaging, hands-on lesson that allows students to learn about the feedback loop that describes the ice-albedo effect. The process of how a team of high school students developed the lesson and associated materials is described. The outcomes of this peer-facilitated lesson as well as the bene ts of the after school club focused on climate stewardship are discussed."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33234


2. "Carbon Footprints, Carbon Sinks, and Carbon Stewardship: A Partnership Between Informal Educators and Classroom Teachers," Krysta Hougen, Jaime Bunting, The Earth Scientist, Spring 2016.

"Pickering Creek Audubon Center of Easton, Maryland, developed and tested an introductory science unit on global climate change in six, fifth-grade classes. Through a series of lessons led by Pickering Creek educators and classroom teachers, students progressed through the topics of carbon, the carbon cycle, greenhouse gases, and climate change. Students learned how our actions affect the global climate, how climate change impacts local habitats and wildlife, and how we can slow the effects of climate change by decreasing our carbon source intake while increasing the planet's carbon sinks. Pickering Creek educators and classroom teachers dispelled common climate change myths and misconceptions, and provided opportunities for students to learn both in the classroom and outside in the schoolyard. Students engaged in age-appropriate climate change solutions by helping decrease their household's carbon footprint, increasing the schoolyard's carbon sink, and by sharing their knowledge with the community and encouraging others to take action as well. Feedback from teachers, school administrators, and the public has been positive and encouraging, and pre- and post-assessment results show an increase in student knowledge regarding climate change topics."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33235


3. "Student Anti-Idling Campaign: Service Learning in Deed," Dale Glass, The Earth Scientist, Spring 2016.

"Adding a science service learning project to a standard inquiry-based environmental science curriculum helped fth grade students learn climate science as they made connections between a real-world problem and their classroom learning. Students brainstormed, researched, and developed a project to address idling in the carpool lane at school. They collected and analyzed data, and used it to build a compelling anti-idling campaign for the school community."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33236


4. "The Polar Bear Challenge: Local Impact on a Global Issue," Christine Schmitz, The Earth Scientist, Spring 2016.

"The Polar Bear Challenge is 21-day statewide event hosted by Utah's Hogle Zoo. It is designed around the concept that polar bears and people want the same thing - a healthy planet. The Zoo is home to a female polar bear that is an ambassador for her species and a tangible way to teach the public about climate change. The Polar Bear Challenge provides teachers and students with a means to lower their carbon footprint by making small changes in their daily lives and lowering their impact on the planet's natural resources. The Zoo challenges each class to make the changes for at least 21 days (the time it takes to start a new habit). Classrooms that make the greatest differences receive prizes from the Zoo and every participating class bene ts polar bear conservation efforts and makes a positive impact on slowing down climate change. Pre- and post-survey results over the past five years have shown an increase in student understanding of climate change science and how their actions can make a difference."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/33237


NSF Announcement
1. Dear Colleague Letter: Principles for the Design of Digital Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Learning Environments (NSF 18-017)
Proposal Deadline: 1/22/18

With this Dear Colleague Letter (DCL), the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorates for Education and Human Resources (EHR) and Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) wish to notify the community of their intention to fund research to support the design of the next generation of digital learning environments for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) content, and in support of STEM education research more broadly. As an important first step in this direction, this DCL encourages a series of synthesis, integration, and design workshops.

This DCL echoes themes that are also important to NSF's long-running Cyberlearning for Work at the Human-Technology Frontier (Cyberlearning) program, which encourages exploratory research in learning technologies to prepare learners to excel in future work at the human-technology frontier.

DUE DATE: Workshop proposals must be submitted by January 22, 2018.
For more information see full letter: https://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2018/nsf18017/nsf18017.jsp