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MSP News: Broadening Participation in STEM and CS

March 16, 2017


2017 NSF INCLUDES Video Showcase


NEWS IN BRIEF


Announcement
1. NEXT WEEK! NSF INCLUDES Video Showcase: Envisioning Impact
March 20th - 27th
Thirty-six NSF-funded INCLUDES projects showcase their work to broaden participation in STEM by presenting three-minute videos of their project. During this week, we hope that you will reserve some time to participate online in this interactive event!
http://includes2017.videohall.com/

New STEM+C Paper
1. "The Hidden Underrepresented Group: Opening the Door to Computer Science for Students with Learning Differences," Sarah Jean Wille, Jeanne Century, Miriam Pike, American Educational Research Association(AERA) Annual Meeting, 2016.

New in Library
1. "The Makerspace Movement: Sites of Possibilities for Equitable Opportunities to Engage Underrepresented Youth in STEM," Angela Calabrese Barton, Edna Tan, Day Greenberg, Teachers College Record, 2017.
2. "Unconscious Bias in the Classroom: Evidence and Opportunities," T. Dee, S. Gershenson, Google Inc., 2017.
3. "Gender Differences in Factors Influencing Pursuit of Computer Science and Related Fields," Jennifer Wang, Hai Hong, Jason Ravitz, Marielena Ivory, Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Educ, 2015.
4. "Enhancing Participation in Computer Science among Girls of Color: An Examination of a Preparatory AP Computer Science Intervention," Allison Scott, Alexis Martin, Frieda McAlear, Moving Students of Color from Consumers to Producers of Technolo, 2017.
5. "Empowering K-12 Students With Disabilities to Learn Computational Thinking and Computer Programming," Maya Israel, Quentin M. Wherfel, Jamie Pearson, Saadeddine Shehab, Tanya Tapia, Teaching Exceptional Children, October 2015.



DETAILS BELOW



New STEM+C Paper
1. "The Hidden Underrepresented Group: Opening the Door to Computer Science for Students with Learning Differences," Sarah Jean Wille, Jeanne Century, Miriam Pike, American Educational Research Association(AERA) Annual Meeting, 2016.

"The computer science (CS) education field is engaging in unprecedented efforts to expand opportunities in K-12 CS education, and to broaden participation of those students traditionally absent from CS. A key component of this effort is the new AP Computer Science Principles (CSP) course, scheduled to launch in the fall of 2016. However, even as the field considers ways to provide access to high school computing in general, and the AP CSP course in particular one of the underrepresented groups is often overlooked: students with learning differences (that is, students with specific learning disorders and related attention disorders, like ADHD). The national dialogue about broadening participation in K-12 computing education, while growing in volume, has given almost no voice to this population. As computing initiatives grow, K-12 teachers need guidance about how to account for challenges specific to learning disabilities and related attention disorders so that students who learn differently can access instruction and curriculum in ways that address their learning needs. To address this problem, a team from Outlier Research & Evaluation at CEMSE | University of Chicago, and Wolcott School (an independent college preparatory high school in Chicago for students with learning differences) is conducting a National Science Foundation (NSF)-supported study (#1542963) that aims to improve the quality of educational opportunities and outcomes in CS for high school students with learning differences. Together, our interdisciplinary group is applying a rigorous research approach to identify challenges specific to learning differences in two sets of CSP instructional materials; making adjustments to the materials to address those challenges; and testing the adjusted materials with students at Wolcott School. The team will share what works and why with AP CSP curriculum developers and CS teachers to equip them with research-derived supports for student needs specific to their learning differences. This paper has two primary aims: (1) to report on the first phase of this NSF-supported research and in doing so, to highlight the need for CS instructional materials development with diverse learners in mind; and (2) to describe the study team's process of collaboration across education research and practice as a critical element of the project, and ultimately of evidence-based, equity-minded change in CS. "

MSPnet Location: Library >> STEM+C Papers
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/31746




New in Library
1. "The Makerspace Movement: Sites of Possibilities for Equitable Opportunities to Engage Underrepresented Youth in STEM," Angela Calabrese Barton, Edna Tan, Day Greenberg, Teachers College Record, 2017.

" Large gaps in achievement and interest in science and engineering [STEM] persist for youth growing up in poverty, and in particular for African American and Latino youth. Within the informal education community, the recently evolving "maker movement" has sparked interest for its potential role in breaking down longstanding barriers to learning and attainment in STEM, with advocates arguing for its "democratizing effects." What remains unclear is how minoritized newcomers to a makerspace can access and engage in makerspaces in robust and equitably consequential ways. This paper describes how and why youth engage in making in an after-school, youth-focused, community-based makerspace program "Making 4 Change." Four in-depth stories of engagement are shared. Using a mobilities of learning framework, we discuss how youth appropriated and repurposed the process of making, and unpack how the program attempted to value and negotiate youths' ways of making from an equity-oriented perspective."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/31750


2. "Unconscious Bias in the Classroom: Evidence and Opportunities," T. Dee, S. Gershenson, Google Inc., 2017.

"The underrepresentation of women and racial and ethnic minorities in computer science (CS) and other fields of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) is a serious impediment to technological innovation as well as an affront to fundamental notions of fairness and equity. These gaps emerge in the early grades and tend to persist, if not widen, throughout the secondary and postsecondary years. The unconscious biases (UB) of teachers, school administrators, and fellow students may contribute meaningfully to the persistence of these gaps. Fortunately, a nascent literature on targeted interventions that directly address UB suggests there may be compelling opportunities to promote broader engagement in CS and STEM education and employment."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/31747


3. "Gender Differences in Factors Influencing Pursuit of Computer Science and Related Fields," Jennifer Wang, Hai Hong, Jason Ravitz, Marielena Ivory, Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Educ, 2015.

"Increasing women's participation in computer science is a critical workforce and equity concern. The technology industry has committed to reversing negative trends for women in computer science as well as engineering and information technology "computing" fields. Building on previously published research, this paper identifies factors that influence young women's decisions to pursue computer science-related degrees and the ways in which these factors differ for young men. It is based on a survey of 1,739 high school students and recent college graduates. Results identified encouragement and exposure as the leading factors influencing this critical choice for women, while the influence of these factors is different for men. In particular, the influence of family is found to play a critical role in encouragement and exposure, and outreach efforts should focus on ways to engage parents."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/31748


4. "Enhancing Participation in Computer Science among Girls of Color: An Examination of a Preparatory AP Computer Science Intervention," Allison Scott, Alexis Martin, Frieda McAlear, Moving Students of Color from Consumers to Producers of Technolo, 2017.

"To address disparities in computing among girls of color, this chapter examines the impact of a multi-year, out-of-school computer science intervention with n=108 female high school students of color. This rigorous and comprehensive 5-week computer science intervention designed within a culturally-relevant framework, demonstrated the following outcomes: 1) one exposure to the intervention demonstrated a significant impact on computer science knowledge, attitudes, and access to diverse peers/role models, 2) the impact of the intervention endured after a 9-month period, and 3) repeated-exposure to the intervention (2 sequential 5-week interventions) produced greater growth than just one summer. These findings suggest that short-term interventions can be impactful, and repeated exposure opportunities are needed to increase growth in knowledge, attitudes, and aspirations among girls of color in computing. This research provides preliminary data for a model for effective programming for girls of color in computer science and has implications for practitioners, researchers, and policymakers."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Ed Change & Policy
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/31749


5. "Empowering K-12 Students With Disabilities to Learn Computational Thinking and Computer Programming," Maya Israel, Quentin M. Wherfel, Jamie Pearson, Saadeddine Shehab, Tanya Tapia, Teaching Exceptional Children, October 2015.

"There are many strategies special educators can employ to increase opportunities for students with learning disabilities to succeed in computing education. Because computing education is a new area of instruction, many special educators may not know how to provide support to students as they learn computing. In this article, several strategies and resources were outlined that special educators can implement to support students who find computing challenging. These instructional practices should be considered alongside the individual needs of each student to develop meaningful, engaging, and accessible computing experiences for students with disabilities."

MSPnet Location: Library >> Teaching and Learning
http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/31631