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Topic: "Tomorrow's STEM Professional, Today's STEM Student: One Student and One Family at a Time"

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To strengthen and shape their upcoming webinar, SABES has posted these questions for the MSPnet community. If you've RSVP'd for the upcoming webinar, please take a moment to answer these questions.
To RSVP for the webinar, go to: http://hub.mspnet.org/index.cfm/webinars/webinar_info?id=320

This archived topic is open to the public.

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This topic has 21 posts, showing: 1-20
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Questions for the community

posted by: Kavita Mittapalli on 3/27/2014 12:59 pm

1) We are implementing problem-based curricula (in contrast to project-based) in the after-school programs with elementary school students. Typically, this approach has been used with secondary grade students. Are there groups/projects that have tried this approach with younger students in urban settings? If so, what are some of the issues we should be prepared to encounter in order to make this successful? Also, is there literature to support our approach and view that can be shared with us?

2) How have others worked to engage families in their children's STEM learning experiences? To what degree were the students expected to drive these interactions?

3) Evaluation questions: If and how has this approach been assessed/evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively? What were the findings/lessons learned? Can anyone share studies/pilots with us?

post moderated on 3/27/2014

A possible resource

posted by: Cecilia Arias on 3/27/2014 11:03 pm

Does the National Research Council's book titled "Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics" offer any insight?

SABES

posted by: Kavita Mittapalli on 3/28/2014 8:33 am

Thanks, Cecilia. We will check it out.

National Resource Council Book-Successful K-12 STEM Education

posted by: Yolanda Abel on 4/11/2014 10:47 am

Thanks. I just downloaded a copy of the book. Looking forward to seeing what the is applicable.

Implenting ABI in Kindergarten

posted by: Katherine Stedman on 3/28/2014 3:52 pm

We are implementing ABI (Argument Based Inquiry) in our science investigations K-8.
I teach Kindergarten and have found that at this level there is still some guidance needed for students. Often, I supply them with a question (since students are still learning how to ask questions). This helps in the process of making a claim and then supporting that claim with evidence. It also helps to model the process for these young students.

Re: Implementing ABI in Kindergarten

posted by: David May on 3/31/2014 12:57 pm

Katherine,

I'm glad to see you're helping guide young children in discussing science. I worked on such project a few years back. The point was to help teachers learn to lead such discussions/arguments among children, and we used written case studies and video clips of the teachers' own classroom discussions which were later turned into a book and DVD to help with teacher PD in this area: "Seeing the Science In Children's Thinking," by Hammer and Van Zee:
http://ww.fountasandpinnell.com/products/E00948.aspx

Before we came up with the book/DVD, we used Karen Gallas's excellent book, "Talking Their Way Into Science," which I highly recommend for everyone: http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED381380

Hope that helps, and good luck!

David May

Implementing ABI in Kindergarten

posted by: Mary Govan on 4/1/2014 8:51 am

David,

Thank you for the websites. I will buy them so that I can learn something that I am not aware of. I do train and mentor science and math teachers.

We do inquiry based learning in our schools.

Mary

post updated by the author 4/1/2014

Suggested Books

posted by: Yolanda Abel on 4/11/2014 10:54 am

Thanks, I have shared them with our larger research team.

SABES

posted by: Kavita Mittapalli on 4/10/2014 7:57 am

Hi, Katherine

Would you have any data to share with me/us?
For instance at the K level, what kinds of question/s might trigger a response using ABI?

As we mentioned earlier in the post, SABES (STEM Achievement in Baltimore Elementary Schools) is focusing on G3-5. In an after school setting, using videography (currently), the researchers at Hopkins are examining the conversations between students (pairs in most cases, sometimes a group of 3-4) might trigger the inquiry-thinking questioning in G3/4/5 students.

In one such case, students are learning how to build paper rockets or make soda cans holders with house hold materials while learning the process of engineering design..

We are going into the schools and taking 20-30 minutes video shots of instances where students work together and are engaged in conversations.
In our case, data is emerging.

At another school, we are investigating how students (in collaboration with teachers and professors at Hopkins) come up with solutions for problems that affect them- for instance garbage issue around their school/s. There are community walking and sharing ideas sessions..

We are eager to learn from MSPnet community about similar approaches and data related to those projects.

Hope you will attend the Webinar on the 24th at 1pm EST.

Kavita Mittapalli
SABES evaluator
MN Associates, Inc.

references

posted by: Gordon Aubrecht on 4/4/2014 11:50 am

Good to hear from you, David. Send me an email to bring me up to date. Gordon

STEM Defined

posted by: Jesse White on 4/7/2014 10:32 am

While I agree there is a great need for Science education, many times I see STEM education defined as applied science or science education. In K-12, Science, Mathematics, and Technology are disciplines that are required to engineer by an Engineer. The National Academy of Engineering published "Engineering in K-12 Education: Understanding the Status and Improving the Prospects (National Academies Press) in 2009 and followed up "Standards for K-12 Engineering Education http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12990. In 2014, they published, STEM Integration in K-12 Education: Status, Prospects, and an Agenda for Research and supported the notion that engineering, as a K-12 discipline is still rather small in practice and that the S, T, & M should be strengthened, interdisciplinary, and project-based.

The only place in K-12 that Technology and Engineering exist are in Career and Technical Education courses (CTE) which have professional organizations, research, and publications.

For K-5 Technology and Engineering, I refer you to www.childrensengineering.org.

For standards of technological literacy look to: www.iteea.org.

Technology is not limited to the use of a computer. It is technology education "which is problem-based learning utilizing math, science and technology principles. Technological Studies Involve:
Designing, developing, and utilizing technological systems
Open-ended, problem-based design activities
Cognitive, manipulative, and effective learning strategies
Applying technological knowledge and processes to real world experiences using up-to-date resources
Working individually as well as in a team to solve problems.

As a CTE Director, I have STEM programs dating back to 1992, am implementing STEM programs and academies (small learning communities focused on STEM careers).

STEM education as Applied Science

posted by: Esther Hopkins on 4/8/2014 2:43 pm

I agree that STEM education is often defined as applied science education. I agree that as a result of this definition STEM education is most commonly observed in the CTE classroom.
The definition of STEM education as applied science provides a route to exclude children from science classes that teach the basic scientific knowledge necessary for them to function as scientifically literate citizens.
CTE classroom teachers are generally not licensed to teach Science. As the documents linked in your post demonstrate, CTE programs have their own set of standards. The CTE standards are not the same as (nor should they be) as the NGSS (http://www.nextgenscience.org/) or other standards for science.
Research implies that students in the United States do not experience a curriculum as focused and content rich (deep) as their peers in other countries (http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/seind02/c1/c1s2.htm).
Could the definition of STEM education as applied science be partly responsible for the US students receiving a less focused, shallow science curriculum?

Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education

posted by: Gay Stewart on 4/9/2014 10:04 am

STEM is not a single word, or a single type of education. For instance, to be a successful engineer, you need a strong background in mathematics and sciences, not just engineering. So, in the new Flexible Education Research Network (FERN) at West Virginia University, the plan is for faculty to develop, identify and test best practices that will broaden participation, as well as improve teaching and learning in each of the STEM fields, thereby developing a strong pipeline for STEM professionals and a scientifically literate public. Since the different disciplines involved currently have some discipline-based education research and there are many commonalities where the disciplines could learn from each other, and where learning in one classroom could improve understanding in another, the FERN will have a primary focus on trans-disciplinary research, which is work that blends approaches from multiple disciplines to address research questions. Initially centered on K-16, graduate and professional training in STEM Education, FERN will be restructured as necessary to permit growth beyond STEM as future needs arise. As a professor of physics and the new Professor of STEM Education helping guide the FERN, I hope we will learn much that will help in this area. But, my point is, we must quit thinking of STEM education as separate from what we do in our disciplines, but as integral. STEM education needs to be more than the sum of the parts, not detached from disciplinary education.

SABES

posted by: Kavita Mittapalli on 4/10/2014 7:41 am

Thanks, Gay and Amy

Useful insights..Please be sure to attend the SABES webinar on the 24th at 1pm EST. I am sure we can learn a lot from FERN and share some data.

At SABES, the team is developing and investigating in-and out-of school curriculum.

Currently, we are interested to know the following:

1) We are implementing problem-based curricula (in contrast to project-based) in the after-school programs with elementary school students. Typically, this approach has been used with secondary grade students. Are there groups/projects that have tried this approach with younger students in urban settings? If so, what are some of the issues we should be prepared to encounter in order to make this successful? Also, is there literature to support our approach and view that can be shared with us?

2) How have others worked to engage families in their children's STEM learning experiences? To what degree were the students expected to drive these interactions?

3) Evaluation questions: If and how has this approach been assessed/evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively? What were the findings/lessons learned? Can anyone share studies/pilots with us?

Best,
Kavita Mittapalli, Ph.D.
MN Associates, Inc
www.mnassociatesinc.com

SABES

posted by: Kavita Mittapalli on 4/10/2014 8:00 am

Thanks, Jesse for the resources. We will check them out...

Not to divert too much from the topic- SABES. We are keen to learn from the MSPNet/community about problem based learning and engaging the community and would love to know your thoughts.

Hope we will "see" you on the 24th at 1pm EST at the webinar.

Best,
Kavita Mittapalli

What is STEM?

posted by: Amy Cohen on 4/9/2014 11:29 am

STEM is merely an acronym for "science, technology, engineering, and mathematics". It does a disservice to both students and teachers to try to narrow it in any way.

As we try to work across all STEM disciplines and venues, we are beginning to realize that the separations between venues (vocational versus college-prep at K-12) and disciplines (science ed versus math ed in so-called higher ed) may be convenient but is not helpful. And folks often omit the various ways that kids and adults try to prepare for the multiple versions of high-school equivalency tests now coming into use.I hope we can all share the various standards and implementations and concerns. Living is "silos" is not good for kids, teachers, and other living beings.

Student as Agent of Change

posted by: Yolanda Abel on 4/16/2014 2:27 pm

As we get closer to our webinar date I am really interested in programs or experiences that anyone may have about how students change their parents attitudes and perceptions of STEM as a result of the student's participation in STEM programming.

Student/Parent attitudes about STEM education

posted by: Ginger Redlinger on 4/17/2014 11:02 am

I recently visited Toppenish School District in the state of Washington and learned about the impact of implementing Project Lead the Way, K-12, on the local community.

This is a school district with 90% FRL (high poverty) 70% ELL, 15% Native American (highly diverse). They showed a video, produced by the Washington Education Association, that showed a young high-school aged student working in her class narrated by her father explaining the impact of STEM education on his thinking about his daughter's future, and his as well.

I recommend you contact Toppenish SD to learn more about this topic.

Ginger Redlinger

post updated by the author 4/17/2014

SABES

posted by: Kavita Mittapalli on 4/18/2014 8:10 am

Thank you, Ginger. We will contact WEA for more information on the PLTW video.

Toppenish School District

posted by: Yolanda Abel on 4/18/2014 9:10 am

Ginger, thanks for the great lead.