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Digest Of Education Statistics: 2007

Abstract

The 2007 edition of the Digest of Education Statistics is now available online. The Digest's primary purpose is to provide a compilation of statistical information covering the broad field of American education from pre-kindergarten through graduate school. The Digest includes a selection of data from many sources, both government and private, and draws especially on the results of surveys and activities carried out by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES).



According to the report, enrollment in public elementary and secondary schools rose 26 percent between 1985 and 2007. The fastest public school growth occurred in Pre-K-8, where enrollment rose 28 percent over this period, from 27.0 million to 34.6 million. Part of the relatively fast growth in public elementary school enrollment resulted from the expansion of pre-kindergarten programs. The NCES forecasts record levels of total elementary and secondary enrollment through at least 2016, reflecting expected increases in the school-age population. In addition, a projected 3.7 million full-time-equivalent elementary and secondary school teachers were engaged in classroom instruction in the fall of 2007. This number has risen 17 percent since 1997, and has risen faster than the number of public school students over the past 10 years, resulting in declines in the pupil/teacher ratio. Most of the student performance data in the Digest are drawn from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). The NAEP assessments have been conducted using three basic designs: the national main NAEP, state NAEP, and long-term trend NAEP. The national main NAEP and state NAEP provide current information about student performance in a variety of subjects, while long-term trend NAEP provides information on performance over time in reading and mathematics only.

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