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STEM Conferences


Presentations by MSP affiliated staff in Year 2007

We are pleased to bring you a listing of MSP-related presentations being given at conferences in calendar year 2007. If you are presenting at an upcoming conference, tell us where and when, and we will add your abstract to this listing. We will post full papers in the MSPnet Library when they are available. Send your papers and abstracts to us through the MSPnet contact form, or email contact@mspnet.org.




Science teachers' perceptions of personal change: Describing influences of an MSP (Mathematics and Science Partnership) program
D. Jackson and S. Sowell
Cleveland MSP

The Association for Science Teacher Education (ASTE)
January 3-6, 2007
This comparative case study explores how practicing science teachers perceive the influences of their participation in a Mathematics and Science Partnership professional development program.


Changing mathematics teachers' beliefs and practices through the use of student data and ongoing professional development.
M. Gilbert, M. E. Strutchens, W. G. Martin, and S. A. Karabenick
MSP Motivation Assessment Program

Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE)
Irvine, CA, January 25-27, 2007
MSP-MAP and TEAM-Math personnel shared their insights and sample tasks from recent professional development sessions focused on changing mathematics teachers’ beliefs (e.g., nature of mathematics, diverse students’ abilities to learn mathematics) and practices (e.g., increasing students’ opportunities to learn, implementing standards-based instruction). Martin demonstrated the use of carefully chosen math tasks to lead their K-12 teachers to rethink their beliefs and practices. Gilbert and Karabenick described student motivational constructs (e.g., efficacy for math, interest, math anxiety, achievement goals) that influence learning and performance. An important component of the presentation involved how data obtained from TEAM-Math students is used in professional development work with TEAM-Math teachers to reify motivational constructs. The session included descriptions of instructional practices (the TARGETT framework) leading to more adaptive student motivation.


Capturing Growth in Teacher Mathematical Knowledge: A Inquiry into Elementary and Middle School Teachers' Understanding of Algebraic Reasoning and Relationships
M. Hedges, L.A. Pruske, and D. Huinker
Milwaukee Mathematics Partnership

Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators Annual Conference
January 25-27, 2007
The Milwaukee Mathematics Partnership engaged elementary and middle school teacher leaders in year-long professional development to strengthen their mathematics knowledge for teaching algebra. Along this journey teachers completed periodic performance assessments and pre-post assessments
to capture and monitor growth in mathematical knowledge for teaching.

Instruction for Mathematical Knowledge for Teachers of Elementary/Middle Grades
K. McLeod, H. Kepner, G. Luck, L.A. Pruske, and M. Hedges
Milwaukee Mathematics Partnership
Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators Annual Conference
January 25-27, 2007
A design team of mathematics faculty, classroom teachers, and math educators construct, team-teach, and revise mathematics content and methods courses for prospective elementary/middle grades teachers. This session will include reflections from each perspective on focusing students toward mathematical aspects that drive instruction, demonstration of the interactions of design team members in course development, team-teaching pilots, interactions with students, and course-sequence revision, and a report of early data collection on these students.


Evolution of a Mathematics Capstone Course for High School Teachers as Recommended in the MET Report
H. Kepner, M. Winsor, E. Aboufadel, G. Burrill, R. Verhey, and D. Dempsey
Milwaukee Mathematics Partnership
Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators Annual Conference
January 25-27, 2007
Capstone course developers from several universities will share their curriculum development and instructional experiences, observations of student work, and preliminary impact on the high school teaching of their students.


The Pedagogical Preparation of Prospective Secondary Mathematics Teachers
L. Romagnano, G. Burrill, H. Kepner, R. Ronau, and P.M. Taylor
Milwaukee Mathematics Partnership
Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators Annual Conference
January 25-27, 2007
The purpose of this symposium is to contribute to the field's understanding of what are commonly referred to as "methods" courses for prospective secondary mathematics teachers. What theories and principles guide the design and enactment of these courses? Presenters will offer several perspectives.


Engineering Professional Development
David Burghardt, and Michael Hacker
Math Science Technology Education Partnership (MSTP)
National Symposium on Professional Development for Engineering and Technology Education
February 13, 2007
The Math Science Technology Education Partnership (MSTP, 2003) is one of the NSF MSP-targeted projects that has as its primary mission the improvement of middle school mathematics instruction and student learning in mathematics, science, and technology education classes. It is the only MSP project that uses engineering design as one of its key elements. The thesis of the project was simple: with more instructional time devoted to mathematics, and with mathematics taught with current pedagogical practice, student learning should improve. As part of the MSTP Project, we have been refining professional development for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) teachers, with a particularly strong focus on mathematics and science teachers. The paper will provide an overview of the three-year evolution in STEM professional development and a detailed examination of the current state.


The Impact of Inquiry-Based Mathematics Courses on Content Knowledge and Classroom Practice
R. Cochran, J. Mayer, and B. Mullins
Greater Birmingham Mathematics Partnership
2007 Conference on Research in Undergraduate Mathematics Education
February 23, 2007
This study includes middle grades teachers participating in the first of a series of inquiry-based mathematics content courses as well as pre-service teachers enrolled in an inquiry-based university course. A variety of data sources (including objective assessment, performance assessment, portfolios, a behavioral checklist, classroom observations and participant surveys) are used to provide a comprehensive picture of participants as learners and teachers of mathematics. This paper describes changes in participants' content knowledge and classroom practice.


Building Teacher Leaders' Capacity to Lead Lesson Study Effectively: Preliminary Results from Southwestern Pennsylvania School Districts
L. Malik and M. Burgess
Southwestern Pennsylvania MSP

NCSM
March 19 - 21, 2007
Strategies and tools used to develop and support teacher leaders from 48 school districts in the Southwestern Pennsylvania Math Science Partnership (SWPA MSP) will be presented. Session participants examine the trajectory of professional growth of teacher leaders which positioned them to serve as effective facilitators of lesson study. Adaptable guiding documents for lesson study will be shared.


Teacher Fellows Taking the Lead in Math Reform
S. Fowler, B. Biglan, and A Lias
Southwestern Pennsylvania MSP

NCSM
March 19 - 21, 2007
Explore activities of the Southwestern Pennsylvania Math Science Partnership that engage K-12 educators, Teacher Fellows, and higher education faculty in a unique way. This exciting collaboration paves the way to improve student learning K-16. Key activities will be shared with time devoted to group discussion.


Developing Mathematics Teacher Leaders: Successes and Challenges
M. Freedman and C. Cecil
Southwestern Pennsylvania MSP

NCSM
March 19 - 21, 2007
The Southwestern Pennsylvania (SWPA) Math Science Partnership has developed teacher leaders who guide colleagues in building learning communities and maintaining ongoing professional development to increase student achievement. A coordinator and a teacher leader will present goals, activities, successes, and challenges of teacher leader academies and the teacher leader model.


Anticipating, Monitoring, Selecting, Sequencing, and Connecting Student Work: Five Actions to Ensure Equity and Access in the Classroom
M. Fierle and C. Murawski
Southwestern Pennsylvania MSP

NCSM
March 19 - 21, 2007
The Thinking Through a Lesson Protocol (TTLP), developed by Dr. Margaret Smith and others at the University of Pittsburgh, engages teachers to think deeply about lessons. The TTLP is aimed at allowing students access to deeper math understanding by engaging the teacher in anticipating, monitoring, selecting, sequencing, and connecting student work.


Southwest Pennsylvania MSP: Lesson Study as a Strategy to Sustain Science Reform Through Educational Leadership
G. Rose and R. Martin
Southwestern Pennsylvania MSP

NSTA
March 29 - 31, 2007
Experience lesson study by observing a video lesson and follow-up meeting of a learning community involved in the process. The presentation involves interactive components of lesson study to engage the participants in the process.


Math and Science Partnership of Southwest Pennsylvania: Informing Parents Through the Use of a Locally Developed Science Parent Handbook
G. Rose and R. Martin
Southwestern Pennsylvania MSP

NSTA
March 29 - 31, 2007
This session will include an introduction to orient participants to the goals and approaches of using a handbook to inform parents of the curriculum and standards for each grade level. The handbook includes samples of student work and scientific investigations, including a typical investigation with related tasks for each grade level.


Focusing on Teacher Quality: The Cleveland Math and Science Partnership
J. Gielow and B. Badders
Cleveland MSP

NSTA
March 29, 2007 - April 1, 2007
Come find out how the Cleveland Municipal School District, with funding from the National Science Foundation, has developed a partnership with John Carroll University, Cleveland State University, Case Western Reserve University, and the Education Development Center. This partnership is focused on improving teacher quality through rigorous university coursework and a content-based mentoring program for middle and high school teachers.


Implementing and Evaluating Reformed Science Curricula for Higher Education and Professional Development Settings
J. Blickenstaff and D. Hanley
North Cascades and Olympic Science Partnership

NARST
April 15-18, 2007

This paper describes the implementation of new curricula in biology and geology with preservice teachers at several higher educational institutions and with inservice teachers at summer professional developments.

We present the impact of theses inquiry-based science curricula on:

1) Participants' content knowledge in science,

2) Participants' understanding and attitudes about inquiry-based science teaching and learning, and

3) Participants' understanding of their learning process (metacognition).



Impact of a Multi-Institutional Curriculum Development Project on Disciplinary Science Faculty
D. Donovan and C. Landel
North Cascades and Olympic Science Partnership

NARST
April 15-18, 2007

This study addresses the impact of a multi-institutional collaboration among disciplinary science faculty to develop undergraduate content courses for future elementary teachers in biology and geology. We report evidence of faculty change in three key areas: (1) Knowledge and beliefs about science teaching and learning; (2) Knowledge and beliefs about K12 teachers and teaching; and (3) Knowledge and beliefs about collaborative practices of effective groups. We also describe evidence of institutional changes initiated and implemented by the faculty as a consequence of the curriculum development project.



The Effect of University Science Faculty Beliefs on Teaching Practices across Contexts
C. Jacobs, S. Yoon, and T. Otieno
University of Pennsylvania Science Teachers Institute

NARST
April 15-18, 2007

As a central component in efforts toward increasing student interest in scientific studies and careers, the milieu of university science teaching is an important current focus of study; teaching reform efforts that include the level of higher education are of key importance if secondary and elementary science teachers, products of the higher education system, are expected to implement such reforms in their own teaching. The goals of this research were to describe the extent to which university science instructors employ student-centered, inquiry-oriented teaching methods in their courses for undergraduates and in-service teachers, and investigate what factors impact their ability or willingness to implement such reforms in these differing contexts. We addressed these questions using a mixed methods approach which resulted in a multiple case study interpretive study. Patterns in the instructors' responses provided insight into individual attributes and institutional structures that are favorable and unfavorable toward effective science teaching at the higher education level.



A Science Lesson Plan Analysis Instrument for Formative and Summative Program Evaluation of a Teacher Education Program
C. Jacobs, S. Martin, and T. Otieno
University of Pennsylvania Science Teachers Institute

NARST
April 15-18, 2007

A Science Lesson Plan Analysis Instrument for Formative and Summative Program Evaluation of a Teacher Education Program," by , presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, New Orleans, Louisiana "In evaluating the success of teacher development programs, measures of teaching practice that are valid, reliable, and scalable are needed. We have developed, validated, and piloted the Science Lesson Plan Analysis Instrument (SLPAI) for quantitative evaluation of teacher-generated multi-day lesson plans. The SLPAI was developed to complement traditional evaluation tools, such as teacher surveys and direct observational protocols, to enable us to capture the extent to which a teacher development program successfully addressed its goals of increasing teacher content and pedagogical knowledge and impacting teaching practice. This paper presents the development and validation of the SLPAI, and demonstrates its use in a pilot study examining teacher change as a result of program instruction. The SLPAI was utilized as a formative assessment, providing baseline information about the teaching practices of incoming program cohorts in order to tailor both pedagogical and content instruction appropriately. The SLPAI was also used to track and describe changes in teaching practice and pedagogical knowledge of teacher participants over time, and thereby provide summative evidence of program effectiveness. We report on the responses of several program instructors to these results, including revisions made to instructional design of their courses.



Developing a mathematics classroom observation protocol for case study research
Sabra Lee, and Carol Baldassari
Focus on Mathematics MSP

EERA CONFERENCE: Affiliate of the American Evaluation Association
April 22-24, 2007
Lee and Baldassari are developing case studies of 6 precollege mathematics teachers. The teachers are participating in extensive, immersive mathematics professional development as part of an NSF-funded project, Focus on Mathematics, for which Lee and Baldassari are the program evaluators.


Motivation and student achievement within the context of a systemic change.
W. G. Martin, M. E. Strutchens, M. Gilbert, S. A. Karabenick, and L. Musu
MSP Motivation Assessment Program

National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM)
April 2007
TEAM-Math and MSP-MAP explore the role of student and teacher motivational factors in its efforts to improve student achievement in 15 largely poor, rural school districts. This partnership both contributes to knowledge of motivational factors and informs TEAM-Math’s activities. The symposium includes presentations of the TEAM-Math systemic change plan, linkages between MSP-MAP and TEAM-Math professional development efforts, and MSP-MAP analyses of TEAM-Math longitudinal data. The emphasis in the analyses to be shared focuses on connections among teachers’ beliefs, use of reform-oriented practices, and student motivation and achievement in mathematics.


High School Mathematics Trajectories: Connecting Opportunities to Learn with Student
Neelam Kher, William Schmidt, Richard Houang, and Zhiwen Zou
PROM/SE

American Educational Research Association (AERA)
April 09, 2007 - April 13, 2007
This study is part of a larger multi-year comprehensive (K-12) mathematics and science curriculum reform initiative focusing on the connection between implemented and attained high school mathematics curriculum. Students' opportunities to learn mathematics content in two geographically diverse school districts were studied to determine if these are linked with student performance in mathematics. All high school students and their mathematics teachers in both districts provided data for this study. Preliminary findings support the contention that curriculum differentiation exists at the high school level. The data suggest that different content trajectories offer very different opportunities to learn within and between school districts and these content trajectories are linked to levels of student performance in mathematics. The findings have implications for student learning outcomes and curriculum policy.


Empowering Teachers to Experience Transformative and Generative Learning Through Authentic Collaboration During Summer School/Intersession
I. Cheng and B. Foley
SCALE

American Educational Research Association (AERA)
April 09, 2007 - April 13, 2007
Teachers engaging in daily collaborative lesson planning around student thinking during summer school experience transformative and generative learning. The process empowers teachers in solving problems encountered in their classrooms while engaging students who have been previously unsuccessful in high school algebra. Because this authentic learning experience, situated in real classrooms, is an experience of identity, teachers experience transformational and gererative learning.


Evidence and Decisionmaking in Education Systems
A. Gamoran, R. Meyer, and C. Thorn
SCALE

American Educational Research Association (AERA)
April 09, 2007 - April 13, 2007
The focus of this session will be primarily on adult learning/decision making within the district and at the intersections (or boundary crossings) between the district and other levels of the educational system: school?district, district?state, and beyond. The primary issue participants will address is how evidence has been/might be produced and used to facilitate learning, cooperation across levels of the system, sound decision-making, and practice that is accountable to others.


Factors That Impede or Enable STEM and Education Faculty Collaboration in Teacher Education Programs
M. Hora
SCALE

American Educational Research Association (AERA)
April 09, 2007 - April 13, 2007
The research question addressed in this study is: (1) what factors shape and influence STEM and education faculty's beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors about collaboration on teacher education programs? This research employed a grounded theory approach to the analysis of interview, documentary, and observation-based data. However, the recurring theme of organizational culture necessitated the identification of a theoretical framework that would adequately explain and situate this concept in a higher education context. An appropriate theoretical frame was found in Bourdieu's theory of practice. Findings included the deleterious effect of disagreements about the responsibility for teacher education, the personal motivations and dispositions of STEM faculty engaged in teacher education, and the importance of neutral territories where collaboration can safely occur.


Middle School Mathematics Teachers' Conceptions of Student Justification
M. Felton
SCALE

American Educational Research Association (AERA)
April 09, 2007 - April 13, 2007
Reform efforts in mathematics education call for students to gain experience with grade-level appropriate reasoning, justification, and proof throughout K-12, both because it is central to mathematics as a discipline and because it can serve to deepen student understanding of mathematical concepts. This study examined 18 in-service algebra teachersÕ conceptions of student justifications. Video data were gathered while teachers solved a mathematical problem and then examined student work and justification on this problem. The results of this study suggest that: (a) mathematical understanding may serve as an obstacle to understanding rigorous justification, and (b) teachers hold conceptions of justification that are unrelated to mathematical proof..


Professional Development: Research on Quality and Effectiveness
D. Patton, E. Maddahian, S. Monempour, L. Munoz
SCALE

American Educational Research Association (AERA)
April 09, 2007 - April 13, 2007
A major urban school district has implemented the Culturally Relevant and Responsive Education Initiative (CRRE) as a means of closing the achievement gap. To meet this end, extensive culturally relevant professional development has been provided to district instructional staff and administrators. Evaluation activities were enacted to assess the quality of the professional development offerings. Our sample included several hundred professional development sessions that were sponsored by a variety of district schools and offices. Based upon our review of culturally relevant and responsive education, effective professional development and culturally relevant professional development literatures, we created a series of frameworks that were translated into instruments. These instruments were used to assess the quality and effectiveness of these professional development sessions.


Letting Go of the Reins: Learning about Scalability in the Context of one District-wide Implementation
D. Cleland and C. Lyon
MSPGP
ETS

American Educational Research Association (AERA)
April 2007
This paper describes results from a collaboration between facilitators from the Math Science Partnership of Greater Philadelphia (MSPGP), the administration and teachers of a suburban Philadelphia school district, and researchers from the Educational Testing Service (ETS). The description provides a number of key insights into the evolution of a professional development initiative from a traditional emphasis on external expertise to one which also relies on the internal wisdom of the group. It  explores the support and advocacy required to address the struggles and challenges inherent in implementing and providing for sustainability of  a systemic  professional development program focused on Formative Assessment. The failures in the first year of efforts  were used to inform changes in the second year which then led to a successful implementation. The MSPGP acted as a third-party provider and took responsibility for planning the implementation, communicating with the district, and providing on-going guidance and support while ETS provided the content and expertise in assessment for learning through their Keeping Learning on Track program materials..


The development of motivation beliefs and their influence on school-related intentions.
A. Conley, S. A. Karabenick, and K. Cortina
MSP Motivation Assessment Program

American Educational Research Association (AERA)
April 2007
This study draws on expectancy-value and achievement goal theories to explore the influence of motivation on students´ school-related intentions. Middle and high school students (N = 6814) in math classrooms (N = 487) in the southern California reported their achievement goals and task values for mathematics and their intent to pursue higher education and enroll in more math courses at the beginning and end of a school year. Confirmatory factor analyses provided support for a measurement model of motivation that included both values and goals. Subsequent path analyses revealed combined and unique influences of goals and values on students´ intentions at the end of the school year. Developmental differences from grade 7 to grade 11 indicate an increase in stability for school-related intentions and smaller effects of motivational variables in higher grades.


Classroom goal structures and adaptive patterns of student learning.
A. Conley, S. A. Karabenick, and J. Blazevski
MSP Motivation Assessment Program

American Educational Research Association (AERA)
April 2007
Classroom environments influence students´ motivation to learn. The ways in which students approach, engage in, and respond to classroom tasks are influenced, in part, by their perceptions of the goals stressed in their classroom or by their teacher. In a mastery goal context, the emphasis is on effort, mastery, and improvement; mistakes are seen as a necessary part of learning, and learning is something to be enjoyed. Contexts with a performance goal structure, on the other hand, stress the importance of ability; teachers frequently compare students, recognize accomplishments publicly, and emphasize the importance of grades and test scores. The present study examined the influence of mastery and performance goal structures on students´ adaptive patterns of learning with a sample of 12,348 students from approximately 500 classrooms in 14 middle and high schools mathematics classes in southern California. Students completed questionnaires in the fall and spring of each year assessing their personal achievement goals as well as the goal structures they perceived in their classrooms. The first set of analyses used self-handicapping as a proxy for adaptive learning. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) indicated that the more that students, collectively, viewed their classes as focused on learning and understanding, the more likely they were to seek needed help from their teachers and other students in their classes, and the less threatened and avoidant they felt when they did seek help. A second set of analyses looked more directly at the influence of the teacher, with an emphasis on teachers´ own motivational beliefs as predictors of students´ motivation to learn. Specifically, the extent to which teachers felt efficacious about their ability to support the motivation of students in their classroom was identified as a significant predictor of between-teacher variance in students´ own efficacy beliefs in math and students´ interest in math (based on HLM when controlling for students gender, EL status, SES, prior ability in math, and grade level). Taken together, these findings point to classroom and teacher factors that contribute to adaptive learning patterns in students.


Motivation to learn mathematics among students with limited English proficiency.
L. Musu, C. Mendez, B. Ammon, and S. A. Karabenick
MSP Motivation Assessment Program

American Educational Research Association (AERA)
April 2007
Research has shown that despite being among the lowest scoring population on standardized achievement tests first- and second-generation Latino students report being more motivated to achieve than their non-Latino peers. However, previous studies have not examined variation in motivation among Latino students, specifically with regard to English language proficiency. We examined how English proficiency was related to English language learners’ mathematics motivation in 436 students from 16 middle and high school mathematics classrooms in two school districts in Southern California. Two groups were compared: those assessed to be English proficient and those less proficient (i.e., English learners — EL). Compared to their English proficient Latino peers, Latino EL students rated themselves higher in efficacy for mathematics, thought that math was more useful, more important and more interesting, and reported experiencing more positive affect in mathematics classes. Discussion includes possible reasons for these findings and their educational implications.


Exploring the effect of standards-based reforms on achievement level.
L. Fell, B. Ammon, and S. A. Karabenick
MSP Motivation Assessment Program

American Psychological Association
August 17-20, 2007
As a result of No Child Left Behind, standards-based reform (SBR) has been initiated in classrooms nation-wide. SBR is an educational model characterized by practices such as cooperative learning, real-world applications, inquiries, autonomy, and student involvement. These methods aim to increase confidence, and thus achievement, in the classroom. However, it is unclear if SBR practices influence all students in the same ways. This study examined the influences of SBR on achievement levels for African-American and Caucasian students at the middle school level. The 748 participants were in 24 classrooms and consisted of 229 6th graders, 201 7th graders, and 318 8th graders. Fifty-one percent of the sample was African American; 54% of the sample was female. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used to analyze how a student’s race (African American or Caucasian) interacts with classroom-level SBR to predict mathematics achievement. Critical thinking and thinking about why something is true in math led to higher achievement for all students, on average. However, the positive effects of teacher emphasis on thinking about why something is true were higher for African American students. Explaining answers on tests predicted increases in achievement for Caucasian students only. These findings make it clear that not all SBR practices are created equal. Because different SBR practices seem to be more beneficial for specific groups of students, teachers, schools, and researchers should consider the differential effects of each practice on achievement, rather than combining them as indicators of the same construct.


The influences of classroom context on educational resilience.
B. Ammon, E.V. DeGroot and S. A. Karabenick
MSP Motivation Assessment Program

Biennial meeting of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction
September 2007
This study explored the effects of teacher support, academic press, and classroom mastery focus on students’ motivation and mathematics achievement. These effects of the classroom context were framed as potential protective factors in promoting resilience among at-risk SES and ethnic groups. Vietnamese, Hispanic, and Caucasian students (n = 644) in grades 7 through 9 participated in the present study. Student ethnicity was found to be a better predictor of math achievement than was SES. Hispanic and Caucasian students were the most at-risk in our sample. Among all students, classroom mastery focus predicted student motivation, which in turn predicted changes in math achievement over the course of an academic year. Among the at-risk groups, teacher fairness and respect additionally predicted student motivation. Overall the results indicate that aspects of the classroom can operate as protective factors for motivational resilience, and the importance of motivation as a mediator between context and changes in achievement.


Perceived family support for learning, achievement goal emphases, and students' achievement goal orientations.
J. Friedel and S. A. Karabenick
MSP Motivation Assessment Program

Biennial meeting of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction
September 2007
Research regarding the achievement goals students espouse has consistently demonstrated relations between such goals and a variety of children’s academic outcomes, including children’s beliefs about their ability to achieve, effortful and strategic engagement in learning situations, and children’s responses to challenge and difficulty. The goal orientations typically discussed are mastery orientation (focus on self-improvement and understanding), performance approach orientation (focus on performing better than others) and performance avoid orientation (focus on not performing worse than others). This study extends research on achievement motivation and family involvement in student learning. We examined students’ perceptions of family support for motivation and academic self-regulation, the relation of such support to students’ perceptions of the achievement goals their families emphasize, and the extent to which perceived family support and achievement goal emphases predict students’ personal goal orientations. Participants were 750 students in US middle and high school math classes. Results of factor analysis indicated that students did not differentiate between family support for motivation and support for cognitive or metacognitive strategy use. Perceived support correlated most strongly with perceived family emphasis on mastery goals. Regression analyses indicated that both perceived support and mastery emphasis positively predicted students’ personal mastery orientations. In addition, perceived family emphasis on both performance approach and avoid goals positively predicted students’ reports of performance approach as well as performance avoid orientations. Thus we found support for a link between perceived family support for motivation and learning strategies in mathematics, and students’ pursuit of mastery goals; however, more research is needed to investigate the family-based antecedents of performance goal pursuit. These findings highlight the critical importance of students’ experiences in the family context as they support student motivation for learning mathematics.